"Me and Michael" as written by and Ben Goldwasser Andrew Vanwyngarden....
Whoa oh oh oh

Not everyone can be like me and Michael
The only problem is forgetting which side you're on
So you think the burning light will reappear on summer nights
Like all the rest, but they can't find out

Whoa oh oh oh

In every scene, it's me and Michael
Imaginary bombs raining down from the clouds
So it seems the danger signs will never let the feelings die
When all the best and brightest have gone

Me and Michael
Solid as they come
Me and Michael
It's not a question now
Me and Michael
Solid as they come
Me and Michael
It's not a question now
Me and Michael (Whoa oh oh oh)

Whoa oh oh oh

Binary star sink like the setting sun
Too happy with ourselves to notice when the change had come
So you think the losing side would never break dividing lines
When sanctity wasn't a thing of doubt

Me and Michael
Solid as they come
Me and Michael
It's not a question now
It's me and Michael
Solid as they come
Me and Michael
It's not a question now
Me and Michael (Whoa oh oh oh)


Lyrics submitted by Mellow_Harsher

"Me and Michael" as written by Ben Goldwasser Andrew Vanwyngarden

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management

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Me and Michael song meanings
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  • +2
    My InterpretationThis song has no concrete interepretation, but here are a few meanings I came up with. But first, here's the official word from the artist. The lead singer of MGMT said that he started with a melody and a generic chorus called "me and my girl". He didn't really like it, so he changed it to "me and Michael" and wrote lyrics with a "great ambiguous story". So ironically, all we know for sure is that we don't know everything. That said, it's still worth trying to figure out what the general story is and where the ambiguity lies.

    I think the first question we should ask is "Who is Michael?" From my own interpretation and the people I've spoken to, Michael is either:

    A. The narrator's imaginary friend.
    B. The narrator's childhood friend.
    C. The narrator's brother.
    D. Someone who the narrator is in a homosexual relationship with.
    E. A combination of two answers.

    Either way, we can tell from the nostalgic melody that the narrator has been close to Michael for quite some time.

    To start, let's imagine that Michael is imaginary, since that's the easiest. The first verse is about him remembering playing with Michael, but as he grew older, an imaginary friend became a "danger sign" that he was insecure or unstable. However, he kept his imaginary friend into adulthood, despite the stigma that was attached to it. The narrator admits that he feels pressure from people see him as the immature "losing side", but is proud that he stuck to his identity.

    Next, let's say that Michael is a real friend. Michael and the narrator have been friends since childhood, but as they grew, their lives took them in different directions and they adapted to different social circles. Eventually this put a strain on their relationship. As the "binary sun" that is their friendship sets, Michael tries to rekindle the friendship, but it's up to the narrator to make it rise again. He has a choice to make that will either end the friendship or solidify it. The phrase "It's not a question now" implies that the narrator has come to a decision, but we never learn what it is.

    The brothers interpretation is basically the same as the friend one, except the split may have been due to their parents divorcing.

    My last interpretation is that Michael and the narrator's childhood friendship grew into a romantic attraction. However, the conflict lies in pressures from their homophobic friends and family. Alternatively, the narrator may be a heterosexual who is beginning to feel uncomfortable now that Michael wants to become more than friends.

    These stories can have some overlap, since they all have the same structure of a close friendship, a conflict, and a choice. Personally, I like to think that they all have a happy ending. I'm most inclined to believe that it's the second version about childhood friends, but the imaginary friend one interests me the most.
    tmedinaon April 05, 2018   Link

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