Trudging slowly over wet sand
Back to the bench where your clothes were stolen
This is the coastal town
That they forgot to close down
Armageddon, come Armageddon!
Come, Armageddon! Come!

Everyday is like Sunday
Everyday is silent and grey

Hide on the promenade
Etch a postcard :
"How I Dearly Wish I Was Not Here"
In the seaside town
That they forgot to bomb
Come, come, come, nuclear bomb

Everyday is like Sunday
Everyday is silent and grey

Trudging back over pebbles and sand
And a strange dust lands on your hands
(And on your face)
(On your face)
(On your face)
(On your face)

Everyday is like Sunday
"Win yourself a cheap tray"
Share some greased tea with me
Everyday is silent and grey


Lyrics submitted by weezerific:cutlery

"Everyday Is Like Sunday" as written by Steven Morrissey Stephen Street

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

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Everyday Is Like Sunday song meanings
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  • +4
    General CommentI have to disagree with comments about how this describes the futility of life. It beautifully details the dullness of the many gone to seed British seaside towns. The song describes Whitstable so perfectly it made me laugh out loud when I first heard it.

    Nobody's mentioned that this, like so many of Morrissey's songs is funny... "trudging back to the bench where your clothes were stolen" is a scene from a sitcom! Calling for the bombing of a town because it's boring is self-consciously and hilariously adolescent. I have no idea what greased tea and strange dust is about but wouldn't be surprised if there were some literary innuendo there.

    On the subject of which, the "come nuclear bombs" line is an obvious reference to John Betjeman's "Slough": "Come, friendly bombs and fall on Slough" but lacks its snobbishness. Morrissey admirers might like to wonder if this little poem didn't influence him just as much as Wilde: cdr.stanford.edu/intuition/…
    EddieTheCaton August 24, 2010   Link

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