"Last of the English Roses" as written by and Pete Doherty....
Honey, honey
My you did look dapper in your mothers
Old green scarf
With your famous Auntie Aurthur’s trousers on
You were slapped by that slapper
And how we all laughed
But she laughed the loudest
Oh in ninety-three
You could charm the bees nees of the bees

Cheeky you’d say and we all fell around
Rolling 'round the playground

Saucy you’d say and we all fell about
Rolling 'round the playground

In the ninety-four
We all sang
Skipping and dancing hand in hand
Yeah with all the boys together
And all the girls together

She’s the last of the English roses
She’s the last of the English roses

(I wish to be so whirl awake again)
She knows her Rodney's from her Stanley's
And her Kappas from her Reeboks
And her tit from her tat
And Winston's from her Enok's
It’s fine and take what I
Coming out, coming alive
Round the Snooker table
You dance the Frutti-Tutti

She almost spilled her lager
Toasting girls of great beauty

But the closing moved by
Coming of age, coming alive
All the boys together
And all the girls together

She’s the last of the English roses
She’s the last of the English roses
Yeah she’s the last of the English roses
She’s the last of, last of the English
English roses

Ah sometimes you can’t change
There’ll be no place
Ce soir, disons chez moi
Enfin je compte de toi
Je te drague la rose mystique
Tu l’arrose mystique?
Ha, vas-y
C’est mon monde de soleil


Lyrics submitted by gratefulxgrapefruit

"Last of the English Roses" as written by Pete Doherty

Lyrics © THE ROYALTY NETWORK INC.

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Last of the English Roses song meanings
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    Song MeaningThe obvious and mainstream interpretation is that it is about a female crush.

    However, consider the fact that it could be about a male:

    - Auntie Arthurs trousers, implies confusion
    - The gay kiss at the end of the official video speaks also in volume
    - The subject person of the song "She almost spilled her lager / Toasting girls of great beauty" It does state she, but this can be argued as a feminisation of the individual
    - Would an "English Rose" be likely to drink a pint? Shows a degree of ambiguity.
    - "Coming out, coming alive", said faintly, as if to hide this being said. A moment of contemplation?
    - The French at the end of the song is from "Our Lady of the Flowers" (Jean Genet, 1943). Written from prison, it follows Divine, the protagonist, who is a drag queen. There are large sections of homosexuality in the story.

    Just a thought, one of controversy, but one backed up with a valid argument.
    TheWagstaffon November 13, 2011   Link

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