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Donald McGillavry Lyrics

Donald's gane up the hill hard and hungry,
Donald comes down the hill wild and angry;
Donald will clear the gouk's nest cleverly,
Here's to the king and Donald Macgillavry.
Come like a weighbauk, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a weighbauk, Donald Macgillavry,
Balance them fair, and balance them cleverly:
Off wi'the counterfeit, Donald Macgillavry.

Donald's run o'er the hill but his tether, man,
As he were wud, or stang'd wi' an ether, man;
When he comes back, there's some will look merrily:
Here's to King James and Donald Macgillavry.
Come like a weaver, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a weaver, Donald Macgillavry,
Pack on your back, and elwand sae cleverly;
Gie them full measure, my Donald Macgillavry.

Donald has foughten wi' rief and roguery;
Donald has dinner'd wi banes and beggary,
Better it were for Whigs and Whiggery
Meeting the devil than Donald Macgillavry.
Come like a tailor, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a tailor, Donald Macgillavry,
Push about, in and out, thimble them cleverly,
Here's to King James and Donald Macgillavry.

Donald's the callan that brooks nae tangleness;
Whigging and prigging and a'newfangleness,
They maun be gane: he winna be baukit, man:
He maun hae justice, or faith he'll tak it, man.
Come like a cobler, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a cobler, Donald Macgillavry;
Beat them, and bore them, and lingel them cleverly,
Up wi' King James and Donald Macgillavry.

Donald was mumpit wi mirds and mockery;
Donald was blinded wi' blads o' property;
Arles ran high, but makings were naething, man,
Lord, how Donald is flyting and fretting, man.
Come like the devil, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like the devil, Donald Macgillavry;
Skelp them and scaud them that proved sae unbritherly,
Up wi King James and Donald Macgillavry!
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For those who don't know this is a song from the Scottish Jacobite rebellion of 1715. Donald MacGillavry of Drumglass is one of the chiefs mentioned in the Chevalier's Muster Roll of 1715, and one of the bards of this clan may have written this song.

and to clear up some of the somewhat archaic 'Scots' language used in the song: gouk's nest = cuckoo's nest (a gouk's also a fool) weighbauk = scales but his tether = without/off his leash wud, or stang'd wit' an ether, man = mad, or stung with an adder elwand = rod that measures an ell, a length of measure no longer used callan that brooks nae tangleness = a fine fellow who doesn't hold with schemes winna be baukit = won't be balked, held back lingel = a shoemaker's thread mumpit wi' mirds = lulled with flattery Arles = Thrashing Skelp them and scauld them = chastise (specifically a slap with the flat of the hand) and scold them

@karb0n13 Thank you so much for explaining these terms! I love the song and had halfway made peace with not being able to understand half of it. Best wishes!

@karb0n13 the song was writ by James Hogg in the 18c. And is a literary form popular at the time the conciet c.f. many of the works of Jonathan Swift. It is in no way aside from namesake based on history, e.g. the song itself is a counterfeit. Brilliant!

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