Take your baby by the hand
And make her do a high handstand
And take your baby by the heel
And do the next thing that you feel

We were so in phase
In our dance hall days
We were cool on craze
When I, you, and everyone we knew
Could believe, do, and share in what was true
Oh, I said

Dance hall days, love

Take your baby by the hair
And pull her close and there, there, there
And take your baby by the ears
And play upon her darkest fears

We were so in phase
In our dance hall days
We were cool on craze
When I, you, and everyone we knew
Could believe, do, and share in what was true
Oh, I said

Dance hall days, love
Dance hall days
Dance hall days, love

Take your baby by the wrist
And in her mouth an amethyst
And in her eyes two sapphires blue
And you need her and she needs you
And you need her and she needs you
And you need her and she needs you
And you need her and she needs you
And you need her and she needs you

We were so in phase
In our dance hall days
We were cool on craze
When I, you, and everyone we knew
Could believe, do, and share in what was true
Oh, I said

Dance hall days, love
Dance hall days, love
Dance hall days
Dance hall days, love
Dance hall days
Dance hall days, love
Dance hall days
Dance hall days, love


Lyrics submitted by numb, edited by benzobopper, vanatic, brossow

Dance Hall Days Lyrics as written by Jack Hues Darren Costin

Lyrics © Spirit Music Group

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Dance Hall Days song meanings
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14 Comments

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  • +3
    General Comment

    Actual lyrics are phase/craze, not vies/cries (which makes zero sense and doesn't rhyme with "days", despite what various other websites also present incorrectly). Also, it's "I, you..." and not "all you...."

    brossowon January 06, 2020   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    For some reason, to me it sounds like an abusive boyfriend likening a fight with his girlfriend nostalgically to when they used to go out dancing.

    That's probably not right, but at first it sounds like they're dancing, but in the second verse it sounds like their fighting because of "take your baby by the hair" and "take her by the ears."

    Or maybe it's rough sex.

    ceremoniouson September 25, 2007   Link
  • +2
    Song Meaning

    This song seems like it's about my favorite book of all time, Lolita by Vladimir Nabakov. It's a book about a man who enters into a horrible and hypnotizing relationship with a 12 year old girl. It's the most mesmerizing prose I've ever read. However, all the lyrics seem to point to this. Humbert loves her childish nature, hence the hand stand. He mentions her "monkey feet" numerous times. The "pull her close and there there there" line matches up with Humbert using her sorrow at her mother's death to comfort/seduce little Lolita. In order to keep Lolita from running away or talking to someone on their endless road trip across America, Humbert Humbert "plays upon her darkest fears". I could go a bit deeper, but I think I made my point.

    dergrimnebulinon September 06, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    I honestly don't know anything about this band. I don't usually listen to this type of music, but the other day i saw this video on tv. Then a few days later I heard it on one of those music channels where they dont play videos they just play songs. The video is really 80's, i like it and got the song. Its very catchy, addictive, and nostalgic to the 80's in general. Do they really only have 3 songs? Does anyone know anything about them?

    Belle-and-Eric-Hajduon April 19, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Great song by Wang Chung, heard they reunited in 2005. BTW they have a song on VCS as well;)

    Punkfather666on April 12, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    this is just a great bit of 80s pop nostalgia. a great little song... can't explain why i like it so much, but that synth melody and the chorus almost take me away to the dance hall days... which i am way too young to have any personal knowledge of.

    nittanylion0on February 16, 2009   Link
  • 0
    Memory

    I hate this song and it's not it's fault. My mom is from a fundie xian family and she married my brother's crazy stupid dad. At one point, his crazy got so bad she went running back to her family's religion as a reaction to his stupidity and tried to ban non religious music in the house. She thought this would stop his drugging and layabout ways. This song was current on the radio and he tried to use it to prove to her that modern music was often supportive of Christianity. He thought the lyrics were "we were so in praise, and I danced all days, we we're cool on Christ......" And kept hounding us to agree that the song was about God. We didn't have the internet to verify stupid claims and he ruined this song.

    pimmyveeon October 23, 2021   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    This song and its video are full of nostalgia for the 1940s. The swing dancing craze of the time involved tossing women in the air, flipping them overhead and underfoot. “Take your baby by the hand / And make her do a high handstand.” This acrobatic coordination required dancers to be in sync, or “so in phase.” Also so in phase was the wider culture, united by a bonding sentiment of patriotism engendered by WWII. This song celebrates everyone around you being united in thought and feeling. “I, you, and everyone we knew / Could believe, do, and share in what was true.” But there is a sinister undercurrent here, of course. “Take your baby by the ears / And play upon her darkest fears.” I see this in tandem with “You need her and she needs you” as an indictment of the domestic abuse which could and did flourish in a time when men and women were wholly dependent on each other. Single, unmarried adults were a rarity. Women could not obtain financial independence outside of marriage, and men were helpless without a woman to do the domestic work. When the culture is a monolith and women could not get away from a bad husband, they had no recourse but to smile and pretend everything was ok if he took a fancy to boxing their ears. I’m not sure what the gemstone lines refer to, except perhaps an allusion to women being placated by gifts of jewels….This song reminds me of David Lynch’s movie Blue Velvet - a slice of wholesome apple pie Americana underpinned by seedy characters doing shockingly violent and twisted things. That feeling is brilliantly encapsulated here in a tight, jangly, catchy four minutes.

    starhermiton February 03, 2024   Link
  • -1
    General Comment

    broke up at end of eighties , 2 guys from england i think did all that electro disco thing.

    groovy1on February 09, 2006   Link
  • -1
    General Comment

    i heard this song on GTA Vice City

    Dubblej23on February 09, 2006   Link

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