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The Radio Dept. – Sleeping In Lyrics 9 months ago
Delicate spokes of arpeggiated guitar swirl above a becalming, eyelid-heavy backing track while in the foreground pesky sibilant percussion bubbles and boils like a swarm of robotic mosquitoes attempting to awaken a sleeping giant.

Though sleeping in seems an adroit metaphor for suicide, as both are typically pre-planned, conscious choices to remain unconscious (excepting faulty alarm clocks), the wonderful sparseness of the lyric also allows for a warning against (or acceptance of) a passive approach to life or artistic creation.

Specific interpretations depend on the perceived degree of sarcasm from the narrator in the line that begins “What commitment, what grace . . .” including disappointment, bewilderment, neutral acceptance or even fascination with a friend’s suicide (or hospitalization for depression). In this regard the key line may be found just prior: “but I don’t even wonder why” – if he was very disappointed with a close friend’s lethargy or shocked by a suicide, he would absolutely wonder, replaying recent interactions in his mind. However, while this suggests neutral acceptance as most likely, the lyric provides no proof this is/was a close friend, the fact of which might color our judgment.

If the narrator didn’t/doesn’t know the person well, we might wonder whether the “empty walls” belong to our slumbering subject (or artist?) or an observer (fan?) who can no longer enjoy (and display) the creator’s works after his “last . . . efforts.” While this may be a stretch, it’s possible the tune concerns passive approaches to life or art, as “dreaming as the evening falls” combined with sleeping in doesn’t require death, just going to bed early and getting up late -- a dog’s life.

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The Radio Dept. – Deliverance Lyrics 9 months ago
Given the dense mix and Swedish accents, I’m never sure posted Radio Dept. lyrics are correct; in fact they always seem wrong in key ways.

First, “all night will be over” seems a banal, nonsense phrase, and I don’t hear any “n” sound or ending “t” like I do in the ‘night’ in “tomorrow night.”
Second, “I’ve got five due tomorrow night“ sounds like library books, not within the spirit of the verses, and I don’t hear the “d” sound required for “due.”
Third, “stay down and come over” implies they're planning something they want to keep secret, possibly illegal or against the rules – what could it be?

On headphones, I hear the new suggestions in brackets below:

Both choruses:
I’ve got [a fight] [here] tomorrow night, I’m alright when I’m not sober
. . . Before I/we leave this town [our gripe] will be over

I think I hear an ending “p” sound that suggests 'gripe', and if ‘fight’ is correct over ‘five’ then we have the following: a schoolboy and his pal are being bullied, gossiped about, etc., and they plan to settle it the old-fashioned way with a fight (‘stay down’, don’t make it public), but in truth he needs intoxicants to get up the courage, hence the green and brown pills.

If “five” is correct, then perhaps it’s: “I’ve got five, [two] tomorrow night” would work if ‘green and brown’ are two explosives, a more extreme means of revenge.

Also, no one’s mentioned the female voice whispering toward the end, which seems to repeat “just believe them,” perhaps a classmate beseeching others to accept their denial of whatever rumor is causing the issue.

Finally, the title “Deliverance” may provide insight, not the film (I hope!) but the Christian definition which Google sez is “activity of cleansing a person of demons and evil spirits in order to address problems manifesting in their life” which may support ‘mad about the boy’s comment about drug addiction or sexual preference being the source of the bullying.

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The Radio Dept. – Pulling Our Weight Lyrics 9 months ago
While a basic interpretation works fine with the lyrics (i.e., about the search for youthful intimacy amidst the difficult responsibilities of modern life, including insanities such as war), given the frequency of gay themes and thoughtful, elliptical double-meanings in the music of the Radio Dept., I’ve always assumed this is about two young gay soldiers, perhaps exploring that ‘side of the fence’ for the first time, brought into ‘close’ contact ‘from far,’ as all battalions gather young men from different home towns. They can ‘barely touch’ without drawing suspicion that would spread gossip (grapevine) quickly, with such activity considered a ‘crime’ in the history of various countries’ military rules, yet are ‘pulling [their] weight’ just like the others, with the same risk of life.
Clever double-meanings of ‘straight line’ (following commanders’ orders vs. heterosexuality) and ‘give in to crime’ (committing acts deemed unacceptable and deviant by portions of society vs. the atrocities at the heart of all wars).
Finally, though the war theme provides a timeless, emotional backdrop, ‘pulling our weight’ could also be a general reference to contributions of gays in society despite the lack of complete acceptance, pressure toward secrecy, etc. Given the band’s typical lyrical style, it could be designed for all of the above, and more …

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The Field Mice – Fabulous Friend Lyrics 3 years ago
Also "some where" should always be a single word, "somewhere."

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The Field Mice – Fabulous Friend Lyrics 3 years ago
@[tootwee4u:24053]
Actually, you both have the first sentence slightly wrong. And 'sentence' is key, for the first three lines are all part of a single sentence, with the word "town" making sense as the place he treated her poorly, and the mistake of "There's', which is actually "Is" adding further confusion. Instead, it should read like this, and the rest of the tune makes more sense.

That hard, cruel, hostile TOWN
IS no place you’d want to fail
If some where you were to fail

So, just one change to the main lyric body, "Is" for "There's"

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The Field Mice – Couldn't Feel Safer Lyrics 3 years ago
One mistake, but a crucial one: instead of "You're so secure" it's "Feel so secure," which makes more sense given he claims to 'fear nothing,' 'couldn't feel safer' etc. Great tune, in any event.

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The Field Mice – Five Moments Lyrics 4 years ago
I spent a few hours on headphones and think I finally figured this one out, very hard due to all the echo, and added the lyric to the site.

I believe the "five moments" relate to the five stanzas of the lyric, representing various stages pre-, during, then after making love. Thus, the breathing 'quickly' with 'warm skin' is followed by slower breathing as sleep eventually approaches.

A much-loved tune by the Field Mice, but perhaps underrated given how hard the lyric is to discern.

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The Fall – Bill Is Dead Lyrics 4 years ago
@[JSBach:17762] Replying to Bozemanite: Thanks for your reply. While that would make sense, part of the art of figuring out lyrics is to listen carefully, often on headphones, without any preconceived notions. If you do (including a live version available on YouTube), you'll hear that he's definitely NOT saying "didn't sleep", but a phrase that ends with a "STEE" sound. There's no "L" sound, as you'd have with "sleep."

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Trembling Blue Stars – All Eternal Things Lyrics 7 years ago
Love the tune as well, but have to mention that it comes directly from an apparent love of the mid-period music of The Cure. In fact, it's essentially a cross between All Cats are Grey (the initial drum pattern and sound, and distant keyboards) from 'Faith' (1981) and The Figurehead (drums again plus the mournful guitar figure that circles in and out) from 'Pornography" (1982). It basically takes a middle ground between the more aggressive doom (and drumming) of The Figurehead and the detachment of All Cats. Love TBS, but this flows so directly from these 2 and other similar period Cure (there are at least 4-5 other elements one could point to), that this must be considered an obvious homage, or what some may view as a rip-off. (YouTube provides an easy comparison) I prefer to consider it the former, not the latter, but everyone can form their own opinion.

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Pants Yell! – Two French Sisters Lyrics 11 years ago
Here's my guess for the missing lines, additions in ALL CAPS:



AT THE COUNTER I dropped off
a piece of paper on the tablecloth of RED GINGHAM

my name and address was neatly pressed on the HEADER



As this is followed by the line about "i was looking for a job, and when I found a job I took it out on everyone I knew", I assume he's talking about dropping off a resume, probably appying for a menial job at a pizza joint or fast food restaurant (this would explain the red gingam tablecloths and his having to wear buttons on his lapels (perhaps a nametag?).

Or, he could be singing from the perspective one of the 'french sisters', either the one who's discussed by the female narrator of the middle section, or by the narrator herself, depending upon whether she has to work and dreams of quitting to ride buses, or if the "poor thing" is the one with the crappy job.


Anyway, that's my best guess.


Great tune, thanks for sharing.


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Barry Manilow – Could It Be Magic? Lyrics 11 years ago
Unfortunately, what is surely the best aspect of this Top 40 ditty, a worldwide smash hit, namely the melody, was lifted directly from Chopin: Opus 28, prelude #20. However, thieves, such as criminal art lovers, can at least be credited with having good taste.

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Eric Carmen – Never Gonna Fall In Love Again Lyrics 11 years ago
Good,syrupy Seventies pop, but as with "All By Myself", Mr. Carmen can't be credited with the melody, which is again directly borrowed from Rachmaninov, in this case from the main theme of the Second Symphony's 3rd movement.

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Eric Carmen – All By Myself Lyrics 11 years ago
I'm not sure if you're aware of this or not, but the main melody line was lifted directly from the second movement of Rachmanov's Second Piano Concerto. Not a bad place to steal, I'll admit, but he can't be credited for the melody (see my comment to "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again" for, yes, another Rachmaninov theft).

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Scud Mountain Boys – Penthouse in the Woods Lyrics 11 years ago
Hard to tell for sure, but here are a few suggested corrections with the changed or added words listed in CAPITAL LETTERS:

1st stanza: "I couldn't empty out my head OF the serious questions"

2nd stanza: "NOW I only wish I could FORGIVE"

3rd stanza: "Why'd you STEAL WHAT YOU SAW? Why'd you STEAL WHAT YOU SAW?" (Only 90% sure about this line, but it's definitely not "yourself")

4th stanza: while the first part about the glove might be correct, I don't hear "remove" -- instead, it sounds like a long "E" sound, not the "oo" sound in "move". The stain part might be right, or it might be "disdain", but this remains the most undecipherable line and will probably require Joe himself to iron out,

Final stanza: "seemed to eat my LIFE away"


Definitely in the Top 5 of SMB tunes. Thanks for sharing.


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Belle & Sebastian – Seeing Other People Lyrics 11 years ago
I think the definitive answer to this whole debate is contained in a clear mistake to the printed lyric above -- it's "you're looking at the working week THROUGH th eyes of a gigolo", NOT "IN the eyes." Also, the "know where to put it" mistake has been noted. Therefore the narrator's partner as portrayed by Stuart as a male (regardless of his public comments), but rather than turn the debate to focus on the gay vs. gay experimentation angle, it's perhaps more fruitful to view this as an extension of the Morrissey lyric paradigm, in which words are intentionally ambiguous NOT only to the hide the truth from the uninitiated (nudge-nudge, wink-wink) and allow mum and dad to hum along without suspecting anything, but to elevate the song to the level of art with appeal to all orientations. Thus, 'Hand in Glove's' line of "everything depends upon how near you stand to me" could appeal to listeners as either same sex in a environment viewing this as a taboo, or an opposite sex pairing with someone deemed unsuitable by the onlooking crowd. It's the outcast in general Morrissey was appealing to, and any 'proof' regarding his personal lifestyle (celibate or not) can't lessen the impact on hetero listeners.

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Red House Painters – Song for a Blue Guitar Lyrics 11 years ago
While I agree with all comments posted thus far on this tune's merit, one thing's always bothered me: it seems an obvious cop from Mazzy Star's "Fade Into You." The pattern and rhythm of the acoustic strumming is identical (albeit modestly slower) and the lagging, loping snare drum punctuates similarly. The slide guitar riff and bass lines differ less than one would expect from a typical high school cover band and with the cadence of the verse delivery also being markedly similar, it's not feasible to assume there wasn't a direct influence, with the Mazzy tune predating Mark's in official release date by three years and being famous worldwide, even among non-alternative types. The only potential defense would be that used by George Harrison for "My Sweet Lord" in court regarding "He's So Fine" which, like the judge did in that case, must ultimately be rejected. No, the melody and chorus aren’t identical (they never are in these cases), but whether subliminal or not, unless both drew from a third, earlier source, this is quite obviously a direct cop.

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Red House Painters – Michigan Lyrics 12 years ago
Given his slurred delivery, some of the lyrics are hard to grasp. Despite this version appearing on all the lyrics sites, I'd like to offer a couple of potential corrections, some rather important:

"I see through your thin cotton dress
I don't know if we'll get to rest" (not "get dressed")

- supported by the fact that, in wearing a dress, albeit a thin cotton one, she's already dressed and they're driving in a car, probably heading for a specific destination, but they end up making a few unplanned detours, first in a parking lot, then eventually to his place near downtown. For me the line "don't know if we'll get to rest", if correct, is my favorite of the entire song, and is poignantly erotic coming just after "thin cotton dress", indicating that either they'll be so involved in, shall we say, 'fun activities' that they won't get much sleep or, alternatively, that they've embarked on a long car journey and may not have time to stop along the way, but her beauty convinces him an initial detour is warranted. (See below)

"You know I've missed you lots" (not "missed your lots")

- In the live version on "Little Drummer Boy", he clearly sings "miss you a lot")

"Warn me of 'cans' and 'nots'" (not "cans and knots")

-In a further clue, in the live version he seems to sing "warn me what I can't and not". It would seem he's asking her to put boundaries on potential 'activities' they might engage in, either in the car while parked, or later when he shows her his room. For me, this line, along with the "show you my bed and things" line, indicates a youthful intimate relationship, perhaps his first, and again adds a youthful poignancy to the song's obvious eroticism


"Will they all pass
Quick like the clouds today? " (not "Quit like the clouds today")

"I felt this way but not before (not "I felt this way the night before")
You pulled me from this heavy floor "

- while he does slur his words a bit, the female backing vocals on the studio version clearly sing "but not before", and it makes much more contextual sense, i.e., he feels more alive after she came into his life

In any event, great song, and I'm sticking with my version (even if Mark himself says "No!") as this amounts to my absolute favorite RHP or MK song

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Red House Painters – Michigan Lyrics 12 years ago
Given his slurred delivery, some of the lyrics are hard to grasp. Despite this version appearing on all the lyrics sites, I'd like to offer a couple of potential corrections, some rather important:

"I see through your thin cotton dress
I don't know if we'll get to rest" (not "get dressed")

- supported by the fact that, in wearing a dress, albeit a thin cotton one, she's already dressed and they're driving in a car, probably heading for a specific destination, but they end up making a few unplanned detours, first in a parking lot, then eventually to his place near downtown. For me the line "don't know if we'll get to rest", if correct, is my favorite of the entire song, and is poignantly erotic coming just after "thin cotton dress", indicating that either they'll be so involved in, shall we say, 'fun activities' that they won't get much sleep or, alternatively, that they've embarked on a long car journey and may not have time to stop along the way, but her beauty convinces him an initial detour is warranted. (See below)

"You know I've missed you lots" (not "missed your lots")

- In the live version on "Little Drummer Boy", he clearly sings "miss you a lot")

"Warn me of 'cans' and 'nots'" (not "cans and knots")

-In a further clue, in the live version he seems to sing "warn me what I can't and not". It would seem he's asking her to put boundaries on potential 'activities' they might engage in, either in the car while parked, or later when he shows her his room. For me, this line, along with the "show you my bed and things" line, indicates a youthful intimate relationship, perhaps his first, and again adds a youthful poignancy to the song's obvious eroticism


"Will they all pass
Quick like the clouds today? " (not "Quit like the clouds today")

"I felt this way but not before (not "I felt this way the night before")
You pulled me from this heavy floor "

- while he does slur his words a bit, the female backing vocals on the studio version clearly sing "but not before", and it makes much more contextual sense, i.e., he feels more alive after she came into his life

In any event, great song, and I'm sticking with my version (even if Mark himself says "No!") as this amounts to my absolute favorite RHP or MK song

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The Fall – Bill Is Dead Lyrics 12 years ago
Great job overall, especially "riding school", which tends to throw some people off (I've seen "right in school" !), and improves the subsequent punchiness of "legs ... so cool."

However, while I could be wrong, I'm fairly certain you're missing the article "a" before "Dynasty", which should not be capitalized, as I assume the usage is slang in Marky's typically personal manner, likely referring to a night on the town involving various intoxicants and attempts to meet members of the opposite sex. Hence, "got pasted in a bar" coming just before "I hope I've got the number" refers to a phone number the protagonist procured from a potential acquaintance who, one can only assume, lacks a "Y" chromosome, and eventually becomes the lady friend he now wakes up with.

As you have it, "D"ynasty would have our narrator up all night watching a horrid American prime time soap opera while drinking stout, perhaps mildy entertaining but hard to imagine worth paying "two days" for and contributing to "the greatest time" of his life.

Taking this thought further, the contrast of the initial "last week", filled with hangovers, with "but just lately", and which he's "renewed" and "aglow" suggests a change and the potential for an ongoing relationship, the key word here being "seeing", which would not make sense for a mere one night stand, supported further by "you dressed today" (as opposed to how she dressed yesterday, last week, etc.). No, it seems our scruffy hero may have fallen into having a (gasp) honest-to-god girlfriend, the "pink sheets" telling us he's staying, or at least frequenting, an abode in which a female selects the bedding (good call on her part -- one can only imagine the condition his place is in!)

In any event, as I've aged this has become my favorite Fall song, proving Mr. Smith is more than a mere ranter, but can cram a novelette within a few paragraphs. Quite a dynasty.

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