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Spoon – Rhthm & Soul Lyrics 11 years ago
Same here! I had to make sure that my ears were fooling me. "The one you saw in Kazaam". You're just a man, Shaq. You are no man of steel. Had to look it up for the same reason.
Now that I see the lyrics they are incredibly cryptic. Seems to be a song about someone in Russia with the references to Kazan (not the brilliant film starring Shaq)and winter getting cold in ways you always forget (love that line). Now that I look at the lyrics more I think it's about the fall of communism in Russia with the antagonist being something of a KGB agent. The "Rhythm and Soul" of the West is starting to flood in and people are beginning to loosen up a little in terms of culture, notably music (note the references to dancing). But the antagonist can't seem to shake his past as a man (presumably another governement agent) continues to follow him from Kazan. The taking of pictures may be a reference to the spy game. I guess overall the point of the song is that the cold war never really ended, and Russia, while seemingly a free democracy, still carries many of its old ways.

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Radiohead – Electioneering Lyrics 13 years ago
I'm surprised no one has really picked up on the "i go forwards, you go backwards, and somewhere we will meet" line. I agree with most of you that the politician is going forwards, and the general public is goin backwards in many aspects. But the "somewhere we will meet" I think has to do with neo-conservative "trickle down" economics, also called "voodoo economics" (also mentioned the song). For those who don't know, "trickle down" economics are generally defined by large tax cuts for the rich and the overall "purging" of big government spending. The idea behind this, in the simplest terms, is that tax cuts for the upper brackets helps to stimulate the economy, which eventually "trickles down" to the lower classes through state-wide prosperity. These Supply-side economics were championed by the Reagan government during the 1980s, and duplicated by similar thinking governments around the world including Margaret Thatcher's Tories in the UK. Many opponents argue that the "trickle down" is never felt in the lower brackets and although the economy may recover and thrive, the majority of citizens see no real prosperity, and are instead faced with rising cost of living and lack of government-sponsored social programs due to the massive trimming of the bureaucracy. I believe the the "somewhere we will meet" line refers to the idea trumpeted by conservative politicians who promise voters that they will eventually meet each other in terms of prosperity, even though the whole idea of one person going forwards and the other going backwards and eventually meeting is far-fetched. This is the metaphor for Radiohead's opinion of "trickle-down" economics.

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Oasis – It's Gettin' Better (Man!!) Lyrics 14 years ago
It drags on like many of the songs on this album...but strip them all down and its really a fabulous record

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R.E.M. – Radio Free Europe Lyrics 15 years ago
I don't think it's about the propaganda on the radio during the cold war, but rather the exclusion of anything remotely related to Western culture by the communist Eastern governments - this included radio stations. The line "straight off the boat, where to go?" seems to allude to immigrants or defects who have left those countries and experience free culture for the first time. It should also be noted that Michael Stipe's lyrics at this point in R.E.M.'s evolution were incredibly murky and cryptic, and were meant to set the atmosphere, rather than tell a direct story, or give meaning. Although, it can be said that this song has some sort of significant meaning.

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The Tragically Hip – Bobcaygeon Lyrics 15 years ago
Bobaygeon is approximately 100km north-east of Toronto, near Peterborough. It is a quiet little village of about 3,000 people, nestelled on an island betweet Pigeon and Sturgeon Lakes, in the Kawartha Lakes region. Not sure why Gord chose Bob of all places, but it is a very pretty town. The video is also filmed there. Thought I'd put that out there for those who were asking.

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XTC – Making Plans For Nigel Lyrics 15 years ago
Definitely a song about parents planning the life of their child out. This song was way ahead of its time in that respect. Remember, this was 1979, long before the Generation X kids would start whining through grunge music about being dienfranchised. If you were to look up "New Wave" in the dictionary, this song would be there.
Primus does a great cover of this song, by the way...I suggest you listen to it!

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The Tragically Hip – Titanic Terrarium Lyrics 15 years ago
I think it's just a song about childhood. There are various allusions to childhood nostalgia. The line about not fucking with the 401 is probably referring to Highway 401 that runs through the north side of Kingston, the hometown of The Hip. They could have possibly played as children in that section of the highway while it was being built. The references to Great-grandfathers and the like, could be the bragging that most kids are inclined to do. "My great-grandfather did this...etc." Each new reference to a relative seems to out-do the last. "Her great-grandfather saw the future," then "My great-grandfather saw the blimp on Sundays," (some obviously more far-fetched then others). I think the song on a whole is trying to say that we live in this sort of bubble as children (or Terrarium). Everything is huge and daunting (Titanic) - "Its bigger than us and larger than we bargained" (The 401).

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Billy Joel – Allentown Lyrics 15 years ago
The line "they threw an American flag in our face," I think, refers to the Reagan Administration's attempt to fix the American post-industrial problem through vigorous patriotism and renewed faith in the American Dream. Unfortunately, this new optimism did not help create any new manufacturing jobs.

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The Tragically Hip – At The Hundredth Meridian Lyrics 15 years ago
Can someone tell me what the hell Gord Sinclair is saying in the backgroung during the chorus?????

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The Tragically Hip – 700 Ft. Ceiling Lyrics 15 years ago
Acutally, vakEirn79 has a good point...after listening to the song in the way he described, its actually a good interpretation.

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The Tragically Hip – Springtime In Vienna Lyrics 15 years ago
Gord Downie has said that this song was inspired by a couple that was fighting outside a house beside the house the band was staying in while recording "Day for Night" in New Orleans. Gord Sinclair facetiously said "I guess it's springtime in Vienna" while watching this couple tear each other's heads off. Downie decided to elaborate on that paradox by writing about the the Nazi's invading Austria in the spring. The most beautiful time of the year, in one of the most beautiful places in the world is the backdrop for a violent invasion. This is an example of "surviving our paradoxes".

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The Tragically Hip – Grace, Too Lyrics 15 years ago
I think Gord Downie's lyrics in this song are truly striking, yet few talk about the Hip's other Gord, who also deserves some respect for making this song's emotion stand out. Gord Sinclair is truly a master of his instrument. Forget the bass guitar not getting respect - Gord Sinclair as a bass player does not get enough respect. Just listen to the album "Day for Night" in its entirety and you'll see what I mean. The entire album is borne out of his slick and melodic basslines. Songs like "Grace Too", "Greasy Jungle", "Yawning or Snarling", "Fire in the Hole" and "Thugs" are all rooted in bassline melodies. Listen to the guitars in "Fire in the Hole" especially. With the exception of the bridge, they never follow a structured melody, or chord progression. Mr. Sinclair takes care of that. Thats what makes it such a dark and murky album, aside from Gord Downie's cryptic lyrics.

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Coldplay – Swallowed in the Sea Lyrics 15 years ago
I think the bridge in this song is absolutely amazing. People underestimate the power of a great bridge in a song. Sometimes it can make or break it. This song has the tone of losing a loved one, and its atmospheric tone gives the lyrics that much more weight. And ZidaneTribal, that instrument is the guitar.

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The Tragically Hip – Thugs Lyrics 15 years ago
Also watch the video for this song and you'll see what I mean. Amazing video, by the way.

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The Tragically Hip – It Can't Be Nashville Every Night Lyrics 15 years ago
Apparently this song is about the over-the-top antics of one Toby Keith. I guess Gord thinks his musical style and the way he conveys himself are ruining country music. There also might be a little resentment for Toby Keith being a supporter of the Bush government (as many country singers are, with the exception of the Dixie Chicks). After all, the "In Between Evolution" album is supposed to be about American ideals and foreign policy.

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The Tragically Hip – Daredevil Lyrics 15 years ago
True, this song is about the daredevils that went over Niagara Falls in barrels. I think the inner meaning is how most people in the world are not risk takers. These daredevils go over the falls purely for the thrill, and most people just don't get it. The last line, "the real wonder of the world is that we don't jump too", I think is pretty self-explanatory - most of us aren't willing to take risks because we are afraid of the outcome. That's more of a wonder than Niagara Falls

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The Police – Does Everyone Stare Lyrics 15 years ago
Don't worry Tepes, you're not alone in thinking that there is a lack of postings for The Police songs. Check out my posting for "O My God". "Does Everyone Stare" is one of my favourite obscure Police songs. Having Copeland sing the first stanza, I think, makes the song. His nervous, shaky voice epitomizes what the song is trying to say.
Another great Stewart Copeland written song - "On Any Other Day" - is also on Regatta de Blanc.

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The Police – O My God Lyrics 15 years ago
Wow! First of all I can't believe there aren't more postings for one of the most influential and underrated bands in the history of pop music. Well, I guess I just answered my own question with that remark - the keyword being "underrated". Whether it was Sting's haunting and infectious songwriting; Andy Summers understated, yet groundbreaking guitar licks; or Stewart Copeland's unmatched high-hat wizardry, the Police were an incredibly influential band with limitless talents. Their fusion of punk rock with reggae and jazz led the way for hundreds of other new wave bands, and influenced bands like No Doubt and Sublime. I have loved The Police my entire life yet I was born one year after their last album. This proves that their music is timeless and is relevant to any generation. I'm sure everyone knows the traditional super-hits like Don't Stand So Close to Me and Every Breath You Take, but the band was so much more than their great singles. Little do people know of their rough around the edges punk-influenced beginnings, as well as their fabulous instrumental (and also experimental) tracks. Every person that I have shown the Police to have been hooked on them - and I'm sure if more people listened to one of their albums right through they also would be hooked.

Sorry about the rant but I feel it was necessary. This song is about Sting questioning his faith in God. He feels like no matter how good he is, or how faithful he is, God doesn't seem to notice. He also questions God's priorities when it comes to helping the world. The stanza about the fat man in the garden and the thin man at the gate might be a metaphor for the rich and the poor - the rich being fat man reaping the benifits of the garden while the the thin man is doing all the work protecting the "gate". Sting wants God to be closer and take notice to the world's blatent atrocities

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The Tragically Hip – The Luxury Lyrics 15 years ago
This is about a convict who just got out of jail and realizes that his life will never be normal again. He gets out of the bing, goes to a hotel with all the amenities, gets a prostitute, but none of these "luxuries" can replace the life he had before he was imprisoned. He can't enjoy the luxury because he can't stop thinking about what he had.

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The Tragically Hip – Fifty-Mission Cap Lyrics 15 years ago
This song's meaning actually goes beyond just the legend of Bill Barilko. The fifty-mission cap that Gord D. refers to is the hat worn by fighter pilots in the World Wars (the ones with the flaps over the ears). After a pilot had completed fifty bombing or dog-fight missions they had the option to return home. Therefore, their hat became a "fifty-mission cap" which they would wear proudly. Gord D. is probably singing about a pilot cap which he attempted to work in to look like an authentic fifty-mission cap, as well as keeping his favourite hockey card tucked underneath. Classic Gord Downie nostalgia piece, conjuring up memories of his Kingston childhood.

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The Tragically Hip – Gus: The Polar Bear From Central Park Lyrics 15 years ago
I also believe that Gus is a metophor for the USA, but please don't say "we have something of a bird's-eye view of American politiks" - you sound just as arrogant as the you claim Americans to be. We don't take a "bird's-eye view" but we do observe, as the politics of the US affect us greatly. Don't get angry like every other Canadian just because Americans don't pay much attention to us. That doesn't give us the right to stick our noses up at them.
Gord Downie, at one concert in Ottawa, said before they played "this is Gus, the metaphor from central park." Its an obvious metaphor for the decline of the United States as the worlds only superpower.

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The Tragically Hip – Thugs Lyrics 15 years ago
This is about a criminal, or "thug" who is torn between his love and his work. The singer is the 'breaking point' of his companion's, meaning his behaviour as a criminal is really bothering, and pushing her. The 'thugs in perpituity' means organized crime is this man's career, and he will constantly (perpetually) be a thug.
Can't really explain the 'birds around the feeder/cat's indifferent' part. Although I believe it could be a reference to God, being the cat, watching his birds (man) with either indifference or anger (the Catholic God for sure!). This criminal may be explaining to his woman that God will always be angry, or just won't care, regardless of what one does (yeah, the 'never neither' double negative threw me off too. In proper english it would mean He is always one of the two emotions). Therefore, the singer is able to justify his criminal actions.
The "I do the rolling..." part is self-explanitory. It is a reference to the preparation of robbers before they go into a score.
The last verse is about his girl wanting to start a family. 'To build [hairbird's] nest...she says I've looked around and I like your hair the best' - the nest being the family reference, and the girl being the hairbird, who has looked around only to find that the perfect man for her, and her future family, is a criminal.

"Ruby, honey are you mad at your man?"
- need I say more?

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The Tragically Hip – 700 Ft. Ceiling Lyrics 15 years ago
The flooding is a blatently obvious allusion to flooding a rink.

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The Tragically Hip – At The Hundredth Meridian Lyrics 15 years ago
I think that this song has absolutely nothing to do with the American musical landscape. If he was talking about that he would have referred to a parallel (e.g. 49th parallel). 100 degrees longitude runs through Canada and the U.S., and is an east-west divider, not a north-south. I think he is talking about the purest part of Canada, the "great plains" that are, for the most part, untouched by urban plight. He says that if he "dies of vanity" he should buried at the hundredth meridian, away from the overcrowed, overconsuming city. If he "dies of vanity", he will at least be buried where life is simple, and without the big city attitude.

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The Tragically Hip – Looking For A Place To Happen Lyrics 15 years ago
I believe that this song is about colonialism in the early days of Canada. Gord is taking the role of what seems to be an explorer from Europe, explaining how he would like to exploit "an ancient race, the kind you'd like to gamble with" (referring to the Native Peoples). He also adds "where they'd stamp on burning bags of shit," referring to the perceived stupidity of the Natives by the Europeans.
In the second verse he talks about leaving his home behind, facetiously describing the landscape as a "masterpiece with...gallery gods and ... garbage bag trees" (the "garbage bag trees" may be an allusion to the song "At the Hundredth Meridian" where he describes a dirty, overrun city with a "swollen sea breeze, garbage bag trees, whispers of disease, acts of enormity"). The place where he comes from may be one of the many overcrowded cities in Europe during the days of colonialism. Gord goes on to sing about painting a "scene from memory, so I'd know who murdered me." He may be talking about the early war paintings that glorify the death of a general, or a very important person.
Finally, the third verse seems to be the most odd of them all. The reference to Jacques Cartier, the famous 16th century French explorer, is the most obvious, but then the verse becomes quite ambiguous (a specialty of Gord Downie's). He seems to take the role of a Native person as he explains to Cartier that he's "not the first to show" and that his people have been on the land since "God, who knows?" Also, the "bum's eye for clothes" line may be the initial culture shock experienced by both the Natives and the Europeans, as the difference in clothing would have been staggering.
"Looking for a place to happen" may be referring to desire to find a passage to the far east, which was the main intention of early explorers. "Making stops along the way" explains the discovery of North America, as it was seen as a "stop" before China after it was discovered by the Europeans.

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