"Those Shoes" as written by and Glenn Frey Don Felder....
Tell us what you're gonna do tonight, momma
There must be someplace you can go
In the middle of the tall drinks and the drama
There must be someone you know

God knows you're lookin' good enough
But you're so smooth and the world's so rough
You might have somethin' to lose

Oh no, pretty momma, what you gonna do in those shoes

Got those pretty little straps around your ankles
Got those shiny little chains around your heart
You got to have your independence
But you don't know just where to start

Desperation in the singles bars
And all those jerk offs in their fancy cars
You can't believe your reviews

Oh no, you can't do that once you started wearin' those shoes

They're lookin' at you, leanin' on you
Tell you anything you want to hear
They give you tablets of love
They're waiting for you, got to score you
Handy with a shovel and so sincere
Ooh, they got the kid glove

You just want someone to talk to
They just want to get their hands on you
You get whatever you choose

Oh no, you can't do that once you started wearin' those shoes
Oh no, you can't do that once you started wearin' those shoes


Lyrics submitted by Demau Senae, edited by hardcor_toonz

"Those Shoes" as written by Glenn Frey Don Felder

Lyrics © Cass County Music / Wisteria Music / Privet Music, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., Universal Music Publishing Group, Red Cloud Music

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Those Shoes song meanings
Add your thoughts

10 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +2
    General CommentFrom an interview with Don Henley and Glenn Frey:

    THOSE SHOES
    DON: One of my favorites. At that time, all the girls were wearing Charles Jourdan shows -- the ones with the little ankle straps. They'd become very popular and we were big fans [laughs]. And so, we said, "Well, it's not enough just to write about that; we have to turn it into a metaphor for women standing on their own two feet, so to speak, and taking responsibility for their own lives, their own losses." That was our intent. The lyric "Once you've started wearing those shoes" meant "Once you've started being your own woman and taking responsibility for your own life; once you've decided not to be just decoration -- an appendage to some guy -- then this is all the crap you're going to have to put up with in conjunction with that." Anyone who decided to become the master of his or her own destiny always has to put up with a lot of crap. On the surface the song was about the singles scene: the beautiful, young women seemingly unaware of the sharks waiting in the shallows... sharks that sometimes included us. It was also a great, great beat. It gave Felder a chance to strap on the talkbox, a device which Joe Walsh pioneered on "Rocky Mountain Way" -- and the two of them soloed together...

    GLENN: As far as I know, it's the only double-talkbox solo in existence. That's Felder and Walsh on talkbox at the end singing "Butt out...butt out...."

    Source:
    glennfreyonline.com/eagles/verybest/…

    So ProfessorKnowItAll was right about the "Butt out" on the talkbox.

    I agree wholeheartedly with PeglegPete's earlier comment that this is their most underrated song. I also think it's one of their very best.
    Volponion April 17, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYeah it does. Thats the first reason y i started listening to this song. Overall it is a good song
    pimpologyon October 03, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI wish the Eagles wrote more songs like this one. I assume Joe Walsh had alot to do with this one, as there's a ton of voice-box stuff on here. If Eric B. and Rakim sampled it, you know it's funky.
    Chinupon January 04, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is their most underrated song.
    PeglegPeteon January 28, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI've always thought the lyrics were a bit off--the "jerkoffs" feels forced and "tablets of love/kid glove"is an awkward rhyme.

    Beyond that, it seems to be about a young starlet who's the talk of Hollywood searching for love in the town of facades, with "those shoes" probably being some sort of designer shoes, as well as a symbol for her fame. She's young and naive ("you're so smooth and the world's so rough"), and life isn't like what it was before fame ("oh no, you can't do that/once you started wearing those shoes"). She's trying to find love ("You just want someone to talk to"), but plenty of guys are willing to take advantage of her loneliness and naivete ("they just want to get their hands on you"; I assume "tablets of love" are drugs to get her to loosen up).

    To me, it always sounded like the talkbox was saying "Butt out, butt out."
    ProfessorKnowItAllon September 20, 2007   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationIn think the shoes referred to in this song are most certianly the iconic platform stilletos that exotic dancers wear. Take the last verse for example.

    "They wanna get your hands on you. You get whatever you choose. Oh no, you can't do that once you started wearin those shoes."

    Obviously as a stripper men want to put their hands on her and she can't say no because of her occupation. And the "tablets of love" are likely date rape drugs, which men often try to give to dancers. She "wants her independence but doesn't know where to start." She may feel that she cannot do well in the world outside of the club. And, in her spare time, she goes to singles bars but no one takes her seriously because "oh no, you can't do that, once you started wearin those shoes."

    The "tall drinks and the drama" describe the atmosphere of a gentlemens' club very accurately.
    They also ask what she's going to do "in those shoes." Sounds to me like a very specific type of shoe.
    SouthernRockStarleton February 04, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI like how he says

    "You just want someone to talk to
    They just wanna get their hands on you
    You get whatever you choose
    Oh, no, you can't do that,
    Once you started wearin' those shoes"

    There's so many girls that dress up on the sleazy side and then can't figure out why men won't take them seriously. And I agree with nittanylion0, this would be a fantastic song to see someone strip to x)
    Lioness89on September 13, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOne of the best Eagles songs. Listened to it in 1980 and loved the beat and Henley's voice track. Knew it would be a hit although it did not get the play I had imagined. The lyrics are right on point should it be referring to a naive woman or a stripper that had to beat back the horn dogs every day. Eagles had excellent writing minds when being dryly sarcastic with the meaning to their songs. REALLY love the sound of this tune and have the last 37 years. If you have not heard it do yourself a favor and listen to it.
    wtm101059on September 30, 2017   Link
  • -1
    General Commentthis is one dirty song. it's just got a nasty feel to it. and i mean that in a good way. i wouldn't be surprised to walk into any strip club in America and find some young thing dancing to this...
    nittanylion0on December 08, 2007   Link
  • -1
    General CommentI love this song seems quite dirty to me, just like I should take a shower. I know it would probably never happen but I would love to hear Nine Inch Nails cover this song.
    Murphyslawon May 28, 2011   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain