Always looking for attention
Always needs to be mentioned
Who does she
Think she should be?
The shrill cry through darkening air
Doesn't she know he's
Had such a busy day?

Tell her sshhh
Somebody tell her sshhh
Oh, no way, no way, there's no movement
Oh, oh, hooray
Slowest

It was only a test
But she swam too far
Against the tide
She deserves all she gets
The sky became marked with stars
As an out-stretched arm slowly
Disappears

Hooray
Oh hooray
No, oh, oh, woh, there's no movement
No, oh, hooray
Oh, hooray

Please don't worry
There'll be no fuss
She was nobody's nothing

(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)

When he awoke
The sea was calm
And another day passes like a dream
There's no no way

(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)
(What's your name?)


Lyrics submitted by weezerific:cutlery

Lifeguard Sleeping, Girl Drowning Lyrics as written by Martin James Boorer Steven Morrissey

Lyrics © DOMINO PUBLISHING COMPANY, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

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Lifeguard Sleeping, Girl Drowning song meanings
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24 Comments

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  • +3
    General Comment

    n/a

    [Edit: deleted]
    baselondonon April 29, 2023   Link
  • +3
    General Comment

    People want life free of responsibility and do not want to get involved, reminds me of 'The Lazy Sunbathers' [Too jaded to question stagnation]

    baselondonon April 29, 2023   Link
  • +3
    My Interpretation

    n/a

    [Edit: deleted]
    kc996on April 29, 2023   Link
  • +3
    My Opinion

    n/a

    [Edit: deleted]
    genericodeon April 30, 2023   Link
  • +2
    My Interpretation

    I've always thought of the girl drowning, being ignored by the sleeping lifeguard and partially dismissed by the narrator as a metaphor. That is, a symbol for those in society who struggle to get their voice heard, or have their cries for help ignored as a result of society's self-absorption and the dismissive attitude of some other individuals or groups. I have similar theories about 'November Spawned A Monster' and 'Mute Witness': a lot of Morrissey's songs of this type could be interpreted as an extended metaphor or allegory which can be generalised to more than one individual, at least to a degree. But hey, that's just me. :)

    PlunderingDesireon October 26, 2010   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    Regardless of how you interpret the lyrics, this is one of the greatest songs Morrisey ever recorded... the (I think it is) tenor sax (sounds like a clarinet at times, but then they can) provides a simple 'voice' for the girl swimming, while the rhythm guitar plays an almost lullaby like tune for the lifeguard... all while the lead guitar gives the narrator's voice a perfect counterpoint. Add the synth, restrained drums that come to the front when needed and the almost constant tambourine and you have these wildly disparate 'voices' all melding together perfectly with Morrisey's own voice to produce a truly remarkabke and beautiful soundscape.

    grenon July 22, 2017   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    This is probably my favourite Morrissey song, or certainly in the top 5. When I first heard it, I thought it wasn't Morrissey. The singing style is so unusual to his normal style. The whole song is like something between Bryan Ferry and Pink Floyd!

    I love how he goes to a whisper at times and the lines "the sky became mad with stars"..."she was nobody's nothing"...."and another day passes like a dream".

    It's quite strange how sings "horray" and "oh no" like he's a third person specutator of this scene, this girl fighting for her life in the sea. Very spooky. She's just swallowed up by the sea which becomes calm after and nobody notices she was there or existed.

    Only Morrissey could come up with such lyrics and ideas for songs.

    roxyfanon October 28, 2013   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    n/a

    [Edit: deleted]
    kc996on April 29, 2023   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    well, what an imaginative interpretation. I see no reference to homicide in this song and I always thought he felt sympathy for the girl and NOT for the lifeguard, who is shown to be insensitive and lazy (the ironic line 'doesn't she know he had such a busy day?'); and that it was one of those songs where Morrissey identifies with the tragic female heroine (as in This Night Has Opened My Eyes, What She Said, November Spawned A Monster...) - she 'swam too far against the tide' = she dared to be different, she wanted too much... The line 'Don't worry, she was nobody's nothing' sounds so tragic.

    But if you want to read stories of "Sal Mineo-like obsessions" into it, then that's what it means for you. I do wonder why the lifeguard seems so unsympathetic, if he's supposed to be the object of love, and why the girl seems so tragic - but that's just me...

    nightanddayon May 18, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Yeah... I think it's very simple. Girl wants attention from lifeguard, fakes drowning, lifeguard's asleep, she drowns. Depressing. Ironic. Morrissey.

    mopo976on September 25, 2006   Link

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