Fame (fame) makes a man take things over
Fame (fame) lets him loose, hard to swallow
Fame (fame) puts you there where things are hollow
Fame (fame)

Fame, not your brain, it's just the flame
That burns your change to keep you insane (sane)
Fame (fame)

Fame (fame), what you like is in the limo
Fame (fame), what you get is no tomorrow
Fame (fame), what you need you have to borrow
Fame (fame)

Fame, "Nein, it's mine", is just his line
To bind your time, it drives you to crime (crime)
Fame (fame)

Could it be the best, could it be?
Really be, really, babe?
Could it be, my babe, could it, babe?
Could it, babe? Could it, babe?

Is it any wonder I reject you first?
Fame, fame, fame, fame
Is it any wonder you're all too cool to fool?
Fame (fame)
Fame, bully for you, chilly for me
Gotta get a rain check on fame (fame)
Fame

Fame, fame, fame, fame
Fame, fame, fame, fame
Fame, fame, fame, fame
Fame, fame, fame, fame
Fame, fame, fame, fame
Fame, fame, fame, fame
Fame, what's your name?

(Feeling so gay)
(Feeling gay)


Lyrics submitted by magicnudiesuit

Fame Lyrics as written by David Bowie Carlos Alomar

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Downtown Music Publishing, Hipgnosis Songs Group, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

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Fame song meanings
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29 Comments

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  • +6
    General Comment

    I laughed when I read the comments, because there is such irony in the fact that, when given the chance to interpret a song crafted by Bowie and Lennon --two of the most beloved and celebrated artists of the last forty years-- not one person knowingly shared any real insight, but instead chose to analyze Bowie's sexuality and private life; in doing so, the commenters unknowingly affirmed the theme of this song.

    "Fame, puts you there where things are hollow." Indeed, more attention is directed at his ambiguous sexuality than his work, proving that substance is hollowed by notoriety.

    FaithinaBoxon August 02, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    why can't people just write about the song and not his life? if you wan't to know about his sexuality then go to wikipedia haha. this song is amazing. it was the first david bowie song i ever heard.

    right2interpreton July 08, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Does Anyone know if the bridge of the song, where he sings the decending "Fame, Fame, Fame, Fame," etc., may have been the first use of a pitch corrector (vocoder)?

    DoctorDevon September 02, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    There's some fascinating background info about the studio development and recording of this song. Bowie said its his least favorite song on the LP. But he loved meeting (and working with) Lennon.

    About the song itself, it has a great melodic hook (James Brown riff?), some great effects, and some cool "easter eggs". Headphones recommended.

    Did no one else hear something like "What's your name?" (with strong echo) and a whispered reply "Satan". I dunno maybe just imagining it.

    txnuke1201on January 29, 2020   Link
  • +1
    My Opinion

    I didn’t know that John Lennon collaborated with David Bowie on ‘Fame.’ Now the tone of the song makes even more sense, for everything about it conveys disillusionment and bitterness toward the industry, the machine that makes up the “business” in Show Business. There’s always a stürm und drang between the artist and the company with whom they’re signed. What Dylan, Prince and George Michael resorted to proves that point. Lennon knew from experience the strangulation and confinement of the artist’s vision brought about by the company’s aim to sell them as a commodity. (I say, the artist wants to tell; the company wants to sell.) I worked for years as the Stage Manager for a splendid venue. My interaction with well-known and internationally acclaimed musicians/singers/performers gave me a hell of an education in their lives and the nature of touring and production of the sound. Oh, I saw some things. My opinion is that fame is a trap. Listen to the lyrics and tone of G. Michael’s “Star People,” “Freedom,” and “Through.” He practically wrote the definitive book on how life was for the people chasing fame, the management of it, and the drive to extract themselves from it to maintain their integrity and artistic freedom. It’s a tough business, especially for women. Bless the artists who stand their ground and persevere, for they’re the ones who truly impact our lives with their holy water of expression.

    Jpgrgear7on February 07, 2023   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Bowie whispers something at the end of the song. On the 1978 tour, they could clearly be made out as "Brings so much pain", although others have suggested on the album version, it is "Feeling so gay, feeling gay".

    magicnudiesuiton December 12, 2001   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    wow..john lennon produced this song.

    weezerific:cutleryon April 27, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    this song is so great! i listen to it over and over and over it never gets old. why only three people have commented on it i dont know. ahh bowie is so great!

    NicoleInWonderlandon June 06, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    I don't mind this song, and although a Bowie fan, I must criticize one of Bowie's live versions of this song, if you could even call it that. It may have been the drugs, he may have just been distracted, but Bowie's performance on 'Soul Train', performing this song was appalling. If he's going to mime, at least be in time with the song, or know the words... he did this also with 'Golden Years'.

    xrachiexon June 20, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    John Lennon did a lot of production for Bowie. Most importantly, in my opinion, is Young Americans where you actually hear a Lennon line, "I heard the News today oh boy."

    p3nguinpi3on May 15, 2004   Link

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