1845 - until the fires die
All our hopes and our dreams are a far cry
1845 - until the hate dies
All the sticks and the stones and the names fly
1845 - look into my eyes
You want to burn with the rest be my guest - die
1845 - under a dark cloud
You want to walk in the past
Is it black enough now?

1845!
1845!
1845!
1845!

Let's take another ride
Let's take another ride
Let's take another ride
Let's take another ride
No more, I see no reason to be,
Not for a dream, not for a lie,
Not for a queen, not for a king
Not for the words in the song that you sing,
The way we live, the way we die,
The way it is - hold your head up
The way we live, the way we die,
The way it is - hold your head up

1845!
1845!
1845!
1845!

Let's take another ride
Let's take another ride
Let's take another ride
Let's take another ride
No more, I see no reason to die,
Not for a flag, not for a high,
Not for a god, not for a book,
Not for the world and the way it should look
The way we live, they way we die,
The way it is - hold your head up
The way we live, the way we die,
The way it is - hold your head up
Until the fires die - A million dead
Until the fires die - A million dead
Until the fires die - A million dead
Until the fires die - A million dead

Is it black enough now? - 1845!
Is it black enough now? - 1845!
Is it black enough now? - 1845!
Is it black enough now? - 1845!


Lyrics submitted by Everlong

1845 Lyrics as written by Christian Ignatiou Brian John Barry

Lyrics © DOMINO PUBLISHING COMPANY

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

1845 song meanings
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5 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment

    "1845 is the date the Irish holocaust set in proper. The British government had impoverished the nation of Ireland, which they had occupied for hundreds of years. They gradually made the majority of people dependent on the potato through economic disparity, and then when the potato blight struck in 1845, the British economists went into overdrive with their murderous idiocies. They insisted that Ireland keep exporting right through the famine, with the result that between one and two million Irish people died. This was genocide. Yap is making the point that all peoples of the world have suffered oppression, no matter whether black, white, red or yellow. Nobody has a monopoly of prejudice, indeed, philanthropy and tyranny are available in all colours (hence the title of the album).

    Which leads us to the conclusion that the only war we should fight is the war against economic inequality - CLASS WAR." - Eddie Stratton

    nayron April 09, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    indeed, thats some nice copying and pasting goin on there;) but seriously OMS are far and away the best british metal band.......

    jesterphizeron July 13, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    technically they're not british :P... but they do rock.. and i love this song

    hugh_jasson July 17, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Nobody has a monopoly of prejudice, indeed, philanthropy and tyranny are "available in all colours" (hence the title of the album).

    It isnt on available in all colours, its on buy now........saved later.

    They are also one of the best live bands too. The pit crew are awesome.

    death to popon April 09, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    I was mildly impressed by OMS,but they have some good songs,but a lot of filler.This is one of the better songs,but I prefr the AIAC album,because it was heavier and the guitar had so much crunch.

    Razormasticatoron April 13, 2004   Link

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