God save the queen
The fascist regime
They made you a moron
A potential H bomb

God save the queen
She ain't no human being
And there's no future
And England's dreaming

Don't be told what you want
And don't be told what you need
There's no future
No future
No future for you

God save the queen
We mean it man
We love our queen
God saves

God save the queen
'Cause tourists are money
And our figurehead
Is not what she seems

Oh god save history
God save your mad parade
Oh lord god have mercy
All crimes are paid

Oh when there's no future
How can there be sin
We're the flowers
In the dustbin
We're the poison
In the human machine
We're the future
Your future

God save the queen
We mean it man
We love our queen
God saves

God save the queen
We mean it man
There is no future
In England's dreaming

No future
No future
No future for you

No future
No future
No future for me

No future
No future
No future for you

No future, no future for you


Lyrics submitted by black_cow_of_death, edited by Humeanbeing

God Save the Queen Lyrics as written by Stephen Philip Jones Paul Thomas Cook

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, Universal Music Publishing Group, Songtrust Ave, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

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God Save the Queen song meanings
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110 Comments

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  • +4
    General Comment

    there's a lot of comments about sid vicious here. i find this a bit odd as he wasn't with the band when they wrote this (matlock/rotten mainly wrote it).

    ramptonon June 13, 2003   Link
  • +3
    General Comment

    I've seen a lot of cynical and judgmental comments by supposedly mature adults about teens having an input by mentioning Avril Lavigne and thinking that what they're saying is edgy and off-beat. As a teen myself, I don't aim to speak for all young people who are fans of Punk but lumping all youths into the "posers" category is unfair. I myself listen to bands like Sex Pistols and The Clash because, firstly, I like the artistry of their music and, secondly, because I love the use of music as a form of rebellion and expression; I agree with what they have to say about breaking taboos and stigmas and not accepting situations for what they are. I'm not trying simply to be "hipstery". To say that I have no right to have an opinion on the music I listen to solely because it was recorded before my birth is fundamentally adverse to what the bands stood for. The bleak, oppressive lives of working-class Brits is still a relevant problem today and if there are no artists singing about the issue today, of course I would listen to music expressing those views. We are not a product of our generation's pop culture. I may be using a phone to type an online comment as many teenagers do but so are adults who listened to Sex Pistols growing up when the internet didn't exist. I may listen to Punk from before I was born but some people still listen to Chopin or Debussy. Who are you or I to judge? Music belongs to whoever listens to it, not the people who listened to it first. If it inspires you and you care about it, who gives a shit when it was recorded? We may have grown in different times but younger and older people faced the same issues growing up - adult apathy, governmental disregard, vapidity and the rest of the crap we're currently (and have always been) swamped in. The world has not changed because the rich will forever cling to their wealth and the powerful will never accept losses and unfortunately rebellious music is rarely written anymore.

    Tanz32on February 08, 2018   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    This song makes me want to dust off my Dogtown skateboard with Tracker trucks/Bones wheels and skate an empty pool. You would have had to lived it to understand the late '70's. But today's youth will soon get their chance as the global economy is eerily similar.

    Sid Vicious was a poser but the rest of the Pistols were the real deal. Song is about the youths' anger, disillusionment, and rebellion of the time period. Let's hope we can at least get good music from this era's issues instead of flash mobs and/or "Trainspotting" mentalities.

    Nighttrainon September 17, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    i want refering to u in paticular, im just annoyed at people thinking that they need to be all clued up in old punk bands, then name drop sid vicous and jonny rotton and think they no all. I wasnt a fan of vicous at all, i still stand by my statedment that vicous was a gimmick, he was put in the band to look "punk", to wear the clothes, and to act the part. He cannot play bass at all, as i understand he couldnt play bass when he was put in the band and on most of the songs its glen matlock playing bass.

    ok but dont hold me to any of this informationcoz its all second hand from mother and father who passed it onto me

    aynz_the_short_chickon September 28, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    What i hate is fucking kids writing shit about how NFG is pop and Avril Lavigne is a poser ect. We all fucking know this shit dudes. Don't go exploiting what we all know and trying to make yourself sound "punk" by bashing other type of music. Sure i hate that music but i don't critize rap, pop, or whatever. If you don't like it, fine don't listen to it. Just don't fucking preach about how you hate it and how its not punk, you make yourself sound like a fucking tool.

    choking_victimon June 22, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    The song was released May 1977. QE2's Silver Jubilee was in June 1977. Coincidence? I know first hand it didn't seem so then.

    montresoron January 27, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    This song probably was written before the Queen's silver jubilee but was definitely released to coincide with it, that's why it became #1 that year. It's about the political landscape at the time and the hopelessness that a lot of young people felt. Funny reading comments from all these teen try-hard wannabe punks. Punk is not an image or fashion, it is a state of mind, and you would have been eaten alive by a real punk in the 70's. As for Sid, he died young, in his prime and became an icon much like James Dean. Johnny and Glenn were the backbone of the Sex Pistols. Well thats my 5cents worth!

    gerimerrymuffinon April 21, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    a near perfect song that makes you feel young when you close your eyes. not to sure I like them being angry at my poor dear queenie but I hear even she likes it.

    mrreeson November 12, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    i think this song rocks. The pistols are fuckin legends man

    Physco Bitchon January 13, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    great song. not much to it, but still great.

    1399on April 13, 2002   Link

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