Two-three-four, oh
Gloria, oh, oh

And I try to sing this song, I
I try to stand up
But I can't find my feet
I try, I try to speak up
But only in you I'm complete

Gloria in te domine
Gloria exultate
Gloria, Gloria
Oh Lord, loosen my lips, loosen my

And I try to sing this song, I
I try to get in
But I can't find the door
The door is open
You're standing there
You let me in

Gloria in te domine
Gloria exultate
Oh Lord, if I had anything
Anything at all, I'd give it to you
I, I'd give it to you, to you
Give it to you
Oh, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh

Hey, this is Red Rocks
Adam Clayton
This is The Edge
Oh, oh, oh, oh

Gloria in te domine
Gloria, [?]
Gloria in te domine
Gloria, gloria
Gloria, [?]
Gloria, [?]
Gloria in te domine
Gloria, gloria


Lyrics submitted by yuri_sucupira

"Gloria" as written by Dave Evans Adam Clayton

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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Gloria song meanings
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33 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentI think, as many of U2's songs are, Gloria is about many things at once. On the surface, on one level, it is about religion and the kind of sudden exultant understanding that can come with it, but also about the similar conveyances of that feeling, through music and through love, and through life in general. I think mainly this song is about religion, but also about a general wonder at the world, the beauty of its order and chaos and of the human interaction and capacity for feeling within and belief.

    This seems to be many times an overlooked song, perhaps because it isn't played very much anymore. It had a powerful impact on me and is a powerfully expressive song, as U2's songs tend to be. I think there's a quote somewhere that they are "the band who never has any trouble expressing how they feel"...'Gloria', through Bono's vocals, Edge's guitar, and through the energy in the song, all of which shape the incredible wonderment and amazement that seems to permeate the music, carries so much and so completely the ideas behind it that perhaps even without words it is a translation of this feeling.
    Little1Caton July 29, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General Commentwell it likes a worship song to God...he is singing part of a clasic hymn with a lil extra of his own... works great...should be more than 1 post on here tho....
    firthelementon October 12, 2004   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI wish more people sang single Latin words for choruses. "Gloria" means so much to me.
    _ellieon August 28, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentWow, when I was much younger and bought the October album, I don't think I had the mental capacity to understand what an incredibly powerful song "Gloria" was. Until very recently, I had almost completely dismissed this song. As I listen to it now, I two things come to mind: 1) Power of Faith, and 2) At that time, Bono must have been much older than his years.

    At the time of October's release, U2 was in turmoil over religion, and this is a very, very powerful album. There isn't a single U2 song that portrays their faith and loyalty to the higher power than this one. Even I, not a particularly religious person, am moved by "Gloria". It demonstrates not even so much that God is the ALL, but that faith in and of itself, whatever you believe, is a power all its own.

    I believe that to be the message of this whole album. As if U2 are coming to the realization that the power of faith is limitless and we all have a different way of showing our faith and belief. The latin is a wonderful, moving touch. Bono's (and Edge's) voice mouth the latin beautifully and the meaning behind each word in this song is punctuated brilliantly with the faithful exuberance of their religious belief.

    The raw emotion in "Gloria" is more captivating and soulful even than the most devout church choir because it comes from the heart and you get the impression that Bono has poured his soul into the words he's singing. Quite possibly U2's most perfectly told story. It's a shame that "Gloria" is never quite given the credit it deserves, as it so often is pushed aside for other, trendier U2 hits.
    eirenightshadeon June 20, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentAlright, something everyone has to understand, since their freely throwing around the word,:

    This song is not religious. It *is* about God and expressing his love for Him, but your not using the word right. He didn't write this song because he *had* to. Religion is a mandate. This song is not.

    In fact, nothing truly by-the-book Christian can be religious because you don't have to do anything, everything you do is a decision made by the goodness of your heart.

    In the same way that after Christ, believers did not have to give tithes(or weekly payments) but instead could give as much or as little as they wanted with no penalty, you don't have to write a song to God, you choose to.
    LilGrim1991on February 06, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI first heard this song back in '82 when I was 14 and have been a U2 fan ever since, for obvious reasons. Even back then I remember thinking that Bono's vocal performance on this track sounded very "sexual"... But as a Catholic schoolgirl I also "got" the religious references in the song, ex: "Gloria" meaning "glory to God".

    IMO the two approaches seemed very dichotomous, at least until recently when I read Niall Stokes' book Into the Heart. To quote Bono: "It is a love song. In a sense it is an attempt to write about a woman in a spiritual sense and about God in a sexual sense. But there certainly is a strong sexual pulse in there".

    This may not be as bizarre as it sounds. Most of Bono's life-defining events happened within a short space of only a year or two (losing his mother in sudden and tragic circumstances; finding God; joining a rock band, meeting his future-wife Ali) so they are probably all intrinsically linked in his mind/heart.
    Lantaon June 11, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General CommentIam no Latin scholar, but I have been told that the latin in the song is awkward and almost "pidgeon" but I think that adds to what the song means to me.

    A simple man in love with his religion and finds that you dont need to know all the proper words to express your love of God.

    He wants to be alongside God 'inside' the church, but is embarrassed he doesnt know the right words "I try, I try to speak up". He doesnt know high latin of the priests (I try to sing this song) so recites what he has heard/remembered but hence the Latin phrases are apparently not sentences, just 'one-liners'. He is frustrated by this "loosen my lips" but it doesn't matter because "the door is open" and he realises that you can express your love of God however you want, when he realises this he is willing to "give it to you(God)"

    Well, thats how I see it
    gingermickon March 22, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General CommentTo those who are curious, the lines:
    In te domine
    Gloria
    Exultate
    Oh, Lord, if I had anything, anything at all
    I'd give it to you.

    Are in Latin, and translate to:
    glory
    In you, sir
    glory
    be glad
    Oh, Lord, if I had anything, anything at all
    I'd give it to you.

    So, in the song Gloria isn't a woman, but it's "glory"
    minpin1071on October 09, 2018   Link
  • 0
    General Commentsupposedly this U2s most religious song. and as half of it is in latin i wont argue. even though i can only comprehend half of it i really like it.
    joeytheboyon September 27, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree. I'm not religious, but Gloria is so powerful it calls you to believe and surrender to faith. Fantastic song!
    rednight1972on October 17, 2004   Link

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