Said the straight man to the late man
Where have you been?
I've been here and I've been there
And I've been in between

I talk to the wind
My words are all carried away
I talk to the wind
The wind does not hear
The wind cannot hear

I'm on the outside looking inside
What do I see?
Much confusion, disillusion
All around me

I talk to the wind
My words are all carried away
I talk to the wind
The wind does not hear
The wind cannot hear

You don't possess me
Don't impress me
Just upset my mind
Can't instruct me or conduct me
Just use up my time

I talk to the wind
My words are all carried away
I talk to the wind
The wind does not hear
The wind cannot hear

I talk to the wind
My words are all carried away
I talk to the wind
The wind does not hear
The wind cannot hear

Said the straight man to the late man
Where have you been?
I've been here and I've been there and
I've been in between


Lyrics submitted by capitol76

I Talk to the Wind Lyrics as written by Ian Mcdonald Greg Lake

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, O/B/O DistroKid

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

I Talk To The Wind song meanings
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37 Comments

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  • +11
    General Comment

    Aside from being such a beautiful song, I think that the song is about a traveler, or a shepherd and the way that they view the world.

    The 'straight man' can correlate to conformity and a norm to society, and the 'late man' is the traveler, who has no use for time and doesn't conform. The rest of the verse explains where he's been.

    The second verse tells how he sees the world. Since he doesn't participate or is a contributor to society, he's 'on the outside looking inside.' He's unbiased but see that the world is messed up.

    The third verse is his how he relates to other people. He's a separated individual and finds that he's of no use to the society.

    I think that the chorus signifies his loneliness. Since the traveler separates himself, the only one he has to talk to is the wind. And so on, it's easy to figure out.

    Johnno7on December 09, 2004   Link
  • +6
    General Comment

    Great insight, Johnno7. I'll disagree in that the protagonist is a "traveler" or "shepherd". It's about an outsider, who is one not because of his profession but rather because of his different outlook on life: "Can't instruct me or conduct me / Just use up my time".

    I actually find this song inspiring, encouraging me to follow the beat of my own drum and ignoring the complaints of the "straight man".

    frijolito_tson February 20, 2005   Link
  • +3
    General Comment

    I think that the song is all about a person who comes from a standpoint of enlightenment. Namely the "late man". They have reached their understanding about the world but realize that it doesn't really matter. Because no matter what they cant pass it on to any other. Every word they say to pass on their understanding gets carried away in the wrong direction or is ignored much like the wind blowing it out of their hands. When the Late man explains his thoughts to the straight man, the straight man is but wind which cannot be impressed or possessed and simply blows away.

    scrutorumcaputon August 18, 2009   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    Strange that there are so few comments on such an old and famous song! and I even now don't understand it. I agree with Johnno7 and more with frijolito - he's an outsider etc., but what puzzles me is: we use to say that we talk to the wind when people don't listen to us or they just don't want to - we don't usually speak to the wind - literally or metaphorically - on purpose. Does he speak to anyone who won't listen to him? could be, but he doesn't seem concerned with other people. Or does he talk to the wind because he likes that? and why should he like talking to the wind? what for? I have no idea. Just to be yourself and express yourself in wonderful isolation, with a partner (the wind) who won't bother you? when he tried to talk to a real partner, that partner tried to instrucy, conduct, possess him and use up his time - all that will never happen if you talk to the silent wind (he cannot hear so he won't reply or disturb you). What do you think?

    thestampon May 13, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    thestamp & Johnno7,

    Nice interpretations. :)

    I heard two versions of this but I cannot find the one with the women singing it; it was .... "stonier". I believe it was in the key of A also.

    dcaton December 12, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    its my opinion that this song is about the relationship between generations, the straight man being the older generation and the late man being the younger one. the straight man has been here and there and so has experience which is represented by the ability to talk to the wind wile the late man is searching for the experience and the ability to talk to the wind liek the straight man does.

    its_a_mad_worldon March 06, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    A comedy team generally has a "straight man," who behaves conventionally, and a "funny man," who makes the jokes. I take the opening lines as a sort of zen joke (here there and in between tells you nothing in a conventional sense, but have a zen flair). I take "talking to the wind" to mean not that the speaker is speaking to no one, but that his words go unheard by others. He's looking at society, but he's not really part of it, and from the tone (both musical and lyrical) he seems to have achieved some sort of peace.

    Quisquillosoon April 20, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    My favorite song on the album...

    battleofnyon April 23, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Goodness me, it has to most beautiful solo ever. First listen was so amazing when I thought it would end and just went on and on... isn't that the definition of progressive music, that you don't leave the song until it's fully finished? You just cram the last juice out of the fruit that is the song.

    Anyways, the solo is just amazing, easily stands up to any solo on any instrument, at least in the "easy" genre of solos.

    moe2000on May 31, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Great song. Love the lyrics and guitar very mello but what KC isnt (21sm

    JohnDylanon August 09, 2005   Link

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