On Raglan Road on an Autumn Day,
I saw her first and knew
That her dark hair would weave a snare
That I may one day rue.

I saw the danger, yet I walked
Along the enchanted way
And I said let grief be a falling leaf
At the dawning of the day.

On Grafton Street in November,
We tripped lightly along the ledge
Of a deep ravine where can be seen
The worst of passions pledged.

The Queen of Hearts still baking tarts
And I not making hay,
Well I loved too much; by such and such
Is happiness thrown away.

I gave her the gifts of the mind.
I gave her the secret sign
That's known to all the artists who have
Known true Gods of Sound and Time.

With word and tint I did not stint.
I gave her reams of poems to say
With her own dark hair and her own name there
Like the clouds over fields of May.

On a quiet street where old ghosts meet,
I see her walking now away from me,
So hurriedly. My reason must allow,
For I have wooed, not as I should

A creature made of clay.
When the angel woos the clay, he'll lose
His wings at the dawn of the day.


Lyrics submitted by yuri_sucupira

Raglan Road Lyrics as written by Patrick Kavanagh Paddy Moloney

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Downtown Music Publishing, Peermusic Publishing, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.

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Raglan Road song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • +3
    General Comment

    If you've ever seen the movie In Bruges, there's a scene where this song is used and it completely makes the scene. Especially since the character is Irish and so far from home. Such a beautiful song.

    derek808on June 29, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    How I love this song. I will never forget "I saw her first and knew That her dark hair would weave a snare That I may one day rue. I saw the danger, yet I walked Along the enchanted way And I said let grief be a falling leaf At the dawning of the day. "

    BoyNamedSue74on May 21, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    its actually a peom written by patrick kavanagh but i think its about a guy for falls for a girl even though he knows hell get hurt. she is quite promiscous but monogamy is very important to him. and so he ends up distraught

    willardon October 20, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Not a bad rendition by Van but try Luke Kelly's version for the full effect. Luke sat down with Kavanagh to arrange the words around the traditional tune "Dawning of the Day" whence the line in the song.

    bearhunteron April 11, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Not a bad rendition by Van but try Luke Kelly's version for the full effect. Luke sat down with Kavanagh to arrange the words around the traditional tune "Dawning of the Day" whence the line in the song.

    bearhunteron April 11, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Stumbled upon this song through Cristin Milioti's version which I found on Youtube. Thank God for that. :)

    migmolon April 20, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    This song was made by an artist a long time ago and argues that most of us have free will, that most of us can choose to master grief that resides within or to have grief master us. It is a hopeful song written by someone who I think intended to try and help others master their own grief, but I'm not sure.

    He said: "Let grief be a falling leaf, at the dawning of the day."

    sdz896542on January 27, 2016   Link

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