"we've fallen on days," leigh said. all hands, blurred
motion. those praying hands. the tragic famine of
words unsaid, hours misspent. it's all flash, after
all. the photographic momentary work of our senses
viewing, tasting, living to deny the bittersweet
desire of whispers written across days of days' lament
... the silence we offer, never to recompense the
experiences we've borrowed.


Lyrics submitted by d_lacy

Roquentin song meanings
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  • 0
    General Comment

    death is a sarifice we all must give. its worth it isnt it?for what we had before we died?

    marble deVoson June 21, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    this is a good jam I must say. Life is indeed short and the mistakes, and acomplishments are just little bits of our live not to get caught up in. And everyone dies, you can't stop it. So live while you can.

    buddahs_best_buddyon December 27, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    this song is so amazing. i have the last line tattoed on my back.

    marble deVoson February 02, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Holy Mother of Merlin, thats devotion to a song...

    SidViciouson February 02, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    incredible song, the lyrics even more so. the message is so true too. we cant get caught up in mistakes we've made in life, its too short, and we have to move on and expirience

    TheMarchOfFlameson April 11, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Antoine Roquentin is the protagonist in Sartre's novel Nausea, and the song deals with the same existential theme as the book. It also place emphasis on artistic creation being a vital aspect of existence "the photographic momentary work of our senses ". In the novel, Roquentin embodies the Sartrean thesis that states that the past and the future do not exist, only the present does.

    We have to dare to live in the now, and accept that the past is gone

    Mute_Airon August 17, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    This would be a great to recite at a funeral... completely serious.

    Forrest-ExCon July 14, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    was just about to post about this being a reference to sartre before i saw an above post. to expand, antoine roquentin is away working when he begins to experience sudden and very intense feelings of nausea. one day while sitting on a park bench he comes to realise that this is based on his growing realisation of the nature of existence. the labels man assigns to objects - "tree", "table", "coin" - are completely superfluous and wrong, as everything possesses a brutal, primitive existence and nothing more...

    Charactarantulaon February 22, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Comment
    laurelinwyntreon April 26, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Just remember tht in death will spend more time than being here alive for a while.

    ticklishgioon November 20, 2008   Link

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