Did you ever hear about the great deception
Well the plastic revolutionaries take the money and run
Have you ever been down to love city
Where they rip you off with a smile
And it don't take a gun

Don't it hurt so bad in love city
Don't it make you not want to bother at all
And don't they look so self righteous
When they pin you up against the wall

Did you ever, ever see the people
With the tear drops in their eyes
I just can't stand it, stand it no how
Living in this world of lies

Did you ever hear about the rock and roll singers
Got three or four Cadillacs
Saying power to the people, dance to the music
Wants you to pat him on the back

Have you ever heard about the great Rembrandt
Have you ever heard about how he could paint
And he didn't have enough money for his brushes
And they thought it was rather quaint

But you know it's no use repeating
And you know it's no use to think about it
Cause when you stop to think about it
You don't need it

Have you ever heard about the great Hollywood motion picture actor
Who knew more than they did
And the newspapers didn't cover the story
Just decided to keep it hid.

Somebody started saying it was an inside job
Whatever happened to him?
Last time they saw him down on the Bow'ry
With his lip hanging off an old rusty bottle of gin

Have you ever heard about the so-called hippies
Down on the far side of the tracks
They take the eyeballs straight out of your head
Say son, kid, do you want your eyeballs back

Did you ever see the people
With the tear drops in their eyes
Just can't stand it no how
Living in this world of lies


Lyrics submitted by yuri_sucupira

The Great Deception Lyrics as written by Van Morrison

Lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

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The Great Deception song meanings
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    General Comment

    This song is my favorite from the Hard Nose The Highway album. It's a great portrait of how rotten things got in 'Love City' (probably referring to the Haight/Asbury area of SF) in the early 1970's, long after the Summer of Love era was over.

    elephant_rangeon August 14, 2009   Link

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