The tangled webs they weave span from Pine to Ruby Ridge, way back from Shay's defeat on up to Gustafsen (now cue the ass parade of ditto-heads and commissars and pricks to drown out this faintest threat of commie faggot heretics). Conclusion: the nail that sticks up gets hammered down and the master's finest tools are found slack-jawed and placid amidst the cacophony of screaming billboards and Disney-fied history. Sometimes the ties that bind are strange: no justice shines upon the cemetery plots marked Hampton, Weaver or Anna-Mae where Federal Bureaus and Fraternal Orders have cast their shadows; permanent features built into these borders. But undercover of the customary gap we find between History and Truth, the Founding Fathers bask in the rocket's blinding red glare. The bombs bursting in air. One nation. Indivisible? The truth is when the back-country learned of ratification the People had a coffin painted black and solemnly borne in funeral procession, they buried it deep in the earth as an emblem of the dissolution and internment of their Publick Liberty. Someday, somewhere, today's empires are tomorrow's ashes.


Lyrics submitted by PLANES

Today's Empires, Tomorrow's Ashes song meanings
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  • +1
    General Comment

    I'm pretty sure "Ana-Mae" is Ana-Mae Aquash a Native American political activist in the 1970s who was murdered. "Hampton" is Fred Hampton, member of the Black Panthers who was murder by the Chicago Police. And I think "Weaver" is Randy Weaver's wife and child who were killed when they tried to set up Randy (who was a white supremacist) for selling arms.

    Not positive but they would make sense.

    SockMonkeyRioton April 29, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    this is defenetly one of my favorite propagandhi songs

    geekgirl9on January 26, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment
    nationofoneon May 23, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    we can only hope the last line is true fck living in the shadows of the usa

    sucker4akisson July 11, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Does anyone know who Hampton, Weaver and Anna-Mae are? I'd love to know, but I haven't been able to find any info on them yet.

    punkpirateon April 24, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    "they" in the Weaver case being the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. They tried to entrap Randy into selling shotguns which he refused, then the U.S. Government killed his son and wife in a seige on their house.

    SockMonkeyRioton April 29, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    "Frayed," not "strange".

    "Sometimes the ties that bind are frayed"

    Medicationson February 16, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    no, the ties that bind are strange, not frayed

    Inside_Myselfon June 27, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Im pretty sure the line is "the ties that bind restrain" not "are strange"

    waffles93on October 04, 2009   Link
  • 0
    Song Fact

    I always thought he said "Sometimes the ties that bind are STRAINED." But it's not. It's definitely STRANGE. Seems all of the official lyrics are posted on the bands site.: propagandhi.com/lyrics/album/todays-empires-tomorrows-ashes

    APEDOGBARKSon June 11, 2018   Link

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