You were once a boy in tattered jeans
With skin dark by the sun
Eyes so wide and deep with reckless dreams
To carry you along

You were always talking 'bout the sea
The brilliant mystic view
You never seemed to shrink from mystery
That was life to you

And you would find a resting place
Where stars would light the room
And trees would bend with sacred grace
Beneath the silver moon

I see you in this height so sad and sweet
Your spirit burning bright
I know he whispers still in places deep
With flaming words of light

And you would find a resting place
Where stars would light the room
And trees would bend with sacred grace
Beneath the silver moon

And you would find a resting place
Where stars would light the room
And trees would bend with sacred grace
Beneath the silver moon


Lyrics submitted by tswift_2

Beneath the Silver Moon Lyrics as written by Matthew Perryman Jones

Lyrics © CONCORD MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC

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Beneath the Silver Moon song meanings
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  • 0
    Song Meaning

    This song is terribly beautiful. The image it brings to mind of a young boy who is a dreamer, full of life and wonder, adventure and curiosity, is quite refreshing. It's the way youth used to be, the way youth never can be as the world continues to get more and more corrupt.

    It seems to me that this song is from the perspective of a man as he reflects on his own boyhood, and refers to his "younger" self as an entity separate from his "current" self.

    The best part of this song is when Matthew says,

    "I see you in this height so sad and sweet Your spirit burning bright I know he whispers still in places deep With flaming words of light"

    It seems as if, from his older perspective (height) and looking back on (or down at) his boyhood, it is both sad and sweet to him how innocent and lively he used to be. His "spirit burned bright". The latter two lines appear to elude to the "child within" this grown man, who still whispers quietly with the lively words, dreams and wonders he once used to have and that used to fill his life and being completely.

    mjennin23on December 26, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    I too, adored the song. The writer's father recently passed on but was apparently ill for quite some time. I read that he had a form of dementia. My own father was brain damaged for 12 years due to a stroke before he passed. The neuro damage was difficult to deal with. You see a robust, healthy figure and then one who slowly deteriorates. Maybe that info will shed new light on the song and it's meaning. I also recently met Matthew Perryman Jones this year. I really was drawn to his music, particularly his lyrics - he's such a poet. He did not disappoint - was such a lovely person!

    viksteron July 06, 2009   Link

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