Blame you Hollywood,
For showing me things you never should
Show a young girl,
In a cruel world.

Because life's not a happy ending,
I'm sure there is some,
Like Johnny and June,
And maybe other people too.

They all would have been killed
In the sound of music,
They would have found out that
Pinocchio could never tell the truth.

She never would have made it to shore,
The little mermaid. He would have married a whore
From a wealthy family, after all he was royalty.

Cinderella would have scrubbed those floors
Till her hands grew old and tired,
And nobody would look away,
That's the way it goes today.

I blame you Hollywood,
For showing me things you never should
Show a young girl,
In this cruel world.

Because life's not a happy ending,
I'm sure there is some
Like Johnny and June,
And maybe other people too.

And maybe other people too
And maybe other people too
And maybe other people too
And maybe other people too
And maybe other people too
Like me and you.


Lyrics submitted by viginti_tres

Hollywood Lyrics as written by Julia Stone Angus Stone

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Hollywood song meanings
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5 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment

    ahh, its making me really sad!!!

    haha.

    its a beautiful song.

    and so true.

    but the last line is the best, its like she knows its probably never going to happen, but she has a secret hope that there will be a happy ending for her.

    hans.on May 20, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    To be quite honest, I didn't really like the sound of this song the first time I heard it, but somehow loved it the second time.I think maybe because I heard the lyrics properly and it really connected to me. Despite this I partially disagree, I think by showing an idealised version of the world to young kids, adults are trying to protect them and let them enjoy the innocence, naivety and the carefree nature of childhood. (Which people will certainly argue, that with growing technology kids can't really be protected.) That being said, I don't really think we want our young ones to know about the real world just yet. The lyrics show the harsh reality of the world, I mean really, how many servants really get to change their life around? People are liars whether we'd like to admit it or not and although I'm not sure if the Prince would've married a whore but I believe he would've married royalty (And does anyone find it a bit disturbing that Ariel was 16?- I still love that movie though.) But even as a grown adult (Well 18, legally I'm an adult) I think I click with the duo's opinion of clinging onto the notion of a "happy ending"... Unfortunately, I don't think everyone will get that oppportunity.

    Sarenaon October 19, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Can anyone tell me who "Johnny and June" are?

    It's a great song, but it bugs me whenever I hear that part, as apparently they HAVE the happy life, but who are they?

    thanks.

    OzPhoenixon November 29, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Johnny Cash and June Carter maybe ?

    *Star*eyes*on June 10, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    as long as Shere Khan never kills Mowgli I'm happy!

    I love this song!

    DrQwerton October 12, 2011   Link

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