Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?

Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?
Why don't you get back into bed?

Reasons to be cheerful, part three
1, 2, 3

Summer, Buddy Holly, the working folly
Good golly, Miss Molly and boats

Hammersmith Palais, the Bolshoi Ballet
Jump back in the alley and nanny goats

Eighteen wheeler Scammells, Dominica camels
All other mammals plus equal votes

Seeing Piccadilly, Fanny Smith and Willie
Being rather silly and porridge oats

A bit of grin and bear it, a bit of come and share it
You're welcome we can spare it, yellow socks

Too short to be haughty, too nutty to be naughty
Going on forty no electric shocks

The juice of a carrot, the smile of a parrot
A little drop of claret, anything that rocks

Elvis and Scotty, the days when I ain't spotty
Sitting on a potty, curing smallpox

Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, one, two, three

Reasons to be cheerful, part three

Health service glasses, gigolos and brasses
Round or skinny bottoms

Take your mum to Paris, lighting up a chalice
Wee Willie Harris

Bantu Steven Biko, listening to Rico
Harpo Groucho Chico

Cheddar cheese and pickle, a Vincent motorsickle
Slap and tickle

Woody Allen, Dali, Domitrie and Pascale
Balla, balla, balla and Volare

Something nice to study, phoning up a buddy
Being in my nuddy

Saying okey-dokey, sing-a-long a Smokie
Coming out of chokie

John Coltrane's soprano, Adie Celentano
Beuno Colino

Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, one, two, three

Yes, yes, dear, dear
Perhaps next year
Or maybe even now
In which case

Woody Allan, Dali, Domitrie and Pascale
Balla, balla, balla and Volare

Something nice to study, phoning up a buddy
Being in my nuddy

Saying okey-dokey, sing-a-long a Smokie
Coming out a chokie

John Coltrane's soprano, Adie Celentano
Beuno Colino

Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, part three
Reasons to be cheerful, one, two, three

I don't mind
I don't mind, don't mind, don't mind, don't mind


Lyrics submitted by whapcapn, edited by uptoeleven

Reasons To Be Cheerful, Pt. 3 Lyrics as written by CHARLES JEREMY JANKEL, DAVID STANLEY PAYNE, IAN ROBINS DURY, STANLEY PAYNE DAVID

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Reasons To Be Cheerful, Part 3 song meanings
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2 Comments

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  • +1
    General Comment

    As much as I liked "Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick" to have bought the 12" single version, "Reasons to be Cheerful, pt. 3" on the other side was really the one I end up playing most often. I love how the chorus cheerlfully counts of f (ideally) in 3s those crazy, irreverent, and sometimes unappealing references to popular culture, classical literature and even some reference to forms of torture in verses where Dury recites them all in a deadpan hip-hip litany that makes the whole mess deliciously infective in it s grooves and is wicked funny yet clever to boot. Like New Wave and Album Rock standard, "Sex and Drugs and Rock-n-Roll", pairing statements about popular culture with deep thought s hidden in nonsense rhymes then wrapped up in catchy dance tunes seems to be an Ian Dury and the Blockheads' trademark that nobody is worring about since they do it really really well.

    pharmageekon December 14, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    But, what are the first two reasons...?

    TimmyGCon February 24, 2013   Link

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