He is a boy
He's very thin
Until tomorrow
Took heroin
Don't like himself very much
'Cause he has set to set to self-destruct
He is
Set to self-destruct
He is
Too good to be true

Enjoy it
Destroy it

He is
Too good to be true
He is
Set to self-destruct (set to self-destruct)

Enjoy it
Destroy it

I could
Hate you anytime
I could
Give you anything

Enjoy it
Destroy it

I forgive you anything
But I could
Hate you anytime

Enjoy it
Destroy it

He is
Set to self-destruct



Lyrics submitted by noyes

Instant Hit Lyrics as written by Paloma Romero Mc Lardy Ariane Forster

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6 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment

    awesome. so unique.

    maggotbrainon January 29, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    From what I've read, if the Slits were talking about men, they were probably referring to men in the early London punk scene. Supposedly, this one is about Keith Levene who was in the Clash in the very early days before they put out an album and later went on to join Public Image Limited, Johnny Rotten's (or John Lydon's, rather) band after the Sex Pistols broke up. Which is especially funny since Levene apparently did some sound mixing for the Slits. I figure that either Levene's relationship with the band ended before they wrote this song, or they just had enough of a dysfunctional relationship that they could write a song like this. Or they didn't tell him it was about him.

    truthbealiaron December 26, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    i heard this one was about Keith Levene as well.

    fuzzyslipperson January 18, 2007   Link
  • 0
    Song Meaning

    I'm sure Ari-Up said this was about Sid Vicious at one of her gigs.

    echoloton December 09, 2008   Link
  • 0
    Lyric Correction

    He is a boy He's very thin Until tomorrow Took heroin Don't like himself very much Cause he is set to, set to self-destruct

    He is Set to self-destruct He is Set to self-destruct He is Set to self-destruct He is Too good to be true

    Can you (destroy it) I know you can (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it)

    He is Too good to be true He is Too good to be true He is Too good to be true He is Set to self-destruct

    Can you (destroy it) You might as well (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it)

    I could Hate you anytime I could Hate you anytime I could Hate you anytime But I for- Give you anything

    Can you (destroy it) Why don't you just (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it)

    I for- give you anything I for- give you anything I for- give you anything But I could Hate you anytime

    Can you (destroy it) And then you can (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it) Destroy it (destroy it) Enjoy it (enjoy it)

    He is Set to self-destruct He is Set to self-destruct He is Set to self-destruct Self-destruct, self-destruct

    invaderDeviLinon October 28, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    The song is about Johnny Rotten and Sid Vicious of the Sex Pistols ("So Tough" is about Keith Levene).

    The song actually refers more to Sid, and the fact he was starting to, or had for a while, been taking Heroin. Also I think "He is a boy, He's very thin." probably describes Sid more then Johhny.

    I think the line "I could hate you" refers to Rotten as he was Sid's friend so obviously didn't want to see his friend taking Heroin, but then hated him because he was ignoring everyone and continuing to take it and because of his addiction everyone but Sid could see what it was doing to him.

    Jim1972UKon August 09, 2012   Link

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