Take me clear up.
Toss me off the tower that is 40 stories tall.
So I’m plastered to the floor.
I must confess, I’m not impressed with your everlasting line.
Take draw, take a look now.
Watch me melt, from man to a boy
and I’m always on the honor society.
With everything and anything around but no attention drawn.
Make me.
I’m just curious to how and why we shouldn’t be amazed.
(so don’t ask why)
Tucked in slick back heart attack, yet no one seems to care.
Take me clear up.
Toss me off the tower that is 40 stories tall.
So I’m plastered to the floor.
I must confess, I’m not impressed with your everlasting line.
Seen expiration come to effect ventilation.
Make me sweet thing.
(so don’t ask why)
Goodbye


Lyrics submitted by PLANES

Chachi song meanings
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3 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment

    anybody heard this song? is it any good?

    honestyormysteryon May 19, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    yeah i've heard it. pretty old... think i found it on napster forever ago... good...not their best...but heck i like everything of theirs...soooo yeah. good.

    jimmysgirlon May 25, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    ahh, the golden napster days...

    jarboffon June 20, 2002   Link

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