Casualties of a non-war
Shooting themselves in the feet
Let me pray before you crush my heart
And you swear that you do this in god's name
Stifling the psalms of the heart
Take your hands off my throat, let me breathe
I'm suffocating
You slash my wrist
Gave me a network
And devoured my art
Broadcast worldwide healing those for a price
And you swear that you do this in god's name
Stifling the psalms of the heart
Casualties of a non-war
Shooting themselves in the feet
Let me pray before you crush my heart
Let me breathe






Lyrics submitted by joshbert13

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    General Comment

    I think this song is about the institutional church, the religious con artistry of so-called "ministers", and healing ministries on TBN.

    jesusfreaks146on May 08, 2010   Link

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