Pardon me, your epidermis is showing, sir
I couldn't help but note your shade of melanin
I tip my hat to the colorful arrangement
Cause I see the beauty in the tones of our skin


We've gotta come together
And thank the Maker of us all

[Chorus]
We're colored people, and we live in a tainted place
We're colored people, and they call us the human race
We've got a history so full of mistakes
And we are colored people who depend on a Holy Grace

A piece of canvas is only the beginning for
It takes on character with every loving stroke
This thing of beauty is the passion of an Artist's heart
By God's design, we are a skin kaleidoscope

We've gotta come together,
Aren't we all human after all?

[Chorus]

Ignorance has wronged some races
And vengeance is the Lord's
If we aspire to share this space
Repentance is the cure

Well, just a day in the shoes of a color blind man
Should make it easy for you to see
That these diverse tones do more than cover our bones
As a part of our anatomy

[Chorus]

We're colored people, and they call us the human race
[Oh, colored people]
We're colored people, and we all gotta share this space
[Yeah we've got to come together somehow]
We're colored people, and we live in a tainted world
[Red and yellow, black and white]
We're colored people, every man, woman, boy, and girl
[Colored people, colored people, colored people, colored people, yeah]


Lyrics submitted by kevin

Colored People Lyrics as written by Toby Mckeehan George C. Cocchini

Lyrics © Capitol CMG Publishing

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Colored People song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment

    How can no one have commented? This song is one of my fav DC Talk tunes, listening to it reminds it why I love them so much in the first place. As always it got a message. These lines pretty much sums it up:

    This thing of beauty is the passion of an Artist's heart By God's design, we are a skin kaleidoscope

    We've gotta come together, Aren't we all human after all?

    Anraon October 10, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Yeah, I agree with you. This song is so relevant to the world today I think. Even with all the policies and everything racism's still out there and real. This song just makes so much sense that I reckon if everyone in the world heard it, and appreciated it racism would cease to exist. Perfect lyrics.

    shirvson November 12, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    yeah i agree you can't atall put people in to catogries of diffrent colours does it make them a diffrent person

    E.Ton January 29, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Beautiful song indeed

    Michelle1705on March 30, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Yes, it's beautiful. DC Talk is (was) a picture of diversity themselves.

    bobbyramseyon January 31, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    i love this song! its so well written especially at the beginning. it is amazing how diverse we are. i love it!

    headbangforjesuson December 19, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Oh man, brings back memories, those good old dayss. great songg

    naynay32on August 12, 2008   Link

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