I heard a human voice who sang like no one else
I heard a proud lady singing loud
Lived her life as she liked, didn't give a damn
But soon she found she was underground and wasted

I watched her hitting notes as she strutted stage
Her body shook oh, she did her stuff
She screamed and quake, give and take, maybe took too much
If you take the smooth you gotta take the rough

Why do you have to die to be a hero
It's a shame a legend begins at its end
Why do you have to die if you're a hero
When there's still so many things to say unsaid

I heard a man's guitar electrify a crowd
I felt the sound shower 'round
And he would take you with him where no music's been before
As you merged the power surge together

His music knew no limits if you were in it's wake
You had no choice, no, but hear its voice
And you would listen hypnotized, and in a dream
But once so strong survive or become weak

Why do you have to die to be a hero
It's a shame a legend begins at its end
Why do you have to die if you're a hero
When there's still so many things to say unsaid

If you gaze across timeless years you'll find them always there
And many gods will join the list compiled with dying care
Hungry mouths are waiting to bite the hand that feeds
And so the living dead carry on immortal deeds

I saw on silver screen an actor's rise to fame
But fast car user lose
That legend's born from death and that is such a shame
'Cause every year new ones appear

Why do you have to die to be a hero
It's a shame a legend begins at its end
Why do you have to die if you're a hero
When there's still so many things to say unsaid


Lyrics submitted by Idan

Heroes End Lyrics as written by Glenn Raymond Tipton

Lyrics © REACH MUSIC PUBLISHING

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Heroes End song meanings
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5 Comments

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  • +1
    General Comment

    "The song was originally blamed for the suicide deaths of two teens in the mid '80s, as the prosecution tried to say the lyrics glorified death as heroic, but the Judge ruled the lyrics were protected by the First Amendment Right of free speech."

    You have this song mixed up with "Better by You, better than Me", off the same album.

    samwaltonon June 22, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    This song basically says that just about every legend and hero is only recognized after his/her death.

    Guerrilla Radioon August 08, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    Three fallen "heroes" of the arts - one a singer (Janis Joplin), one a guitarist (Jimi Hendrix) and one an actor (James Dean).

    The song was originally blamed for the suicide deaths of two teens in the mid '80s, as the prosecution tried to say the lyrics glorified death as heroic, but the Judge ruled the lyrics were protected by the First Amendment Right of free speech.

    Far from glorifying a desire to die, the song simply asks the question: Why do people have to die before they are recognized as heroes for their efforts?

    thetrooperron March 14, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    No, actually he's right. This was the song they tried to sue Priest for. But when they found out that they couldn't sue them becuase the First Amendment protected the lyrics they came up with the idea of backwards messages in "Better By You, Better Than Me" instead.

    As for the meaning, I think thetrooperr got it right.

    samsonitenon January 14, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    The last line in the second verse is wrong.

    "But once so strong survive or become weak" should be "But one so strong so long becomes weak"

    I've always loved this tune and thetrooperr pretty much nailed it. I can't believe that anybody could think that this song glorifies death. "That legend's born from death and that is such a shame" doesn't smack of glorification to me.

    RushAsson February 08, 2011   Link

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