Extreme ways are back again
Extreme places I didn't know
I broke everything new again
Everything that I'd owned
I threw it out the windows, came along
Extreme ways I know move apart The colors of my sea
Perfect color me

Extreme ways that help me
That help me out late at night
Extreme places I had gone
But never seen any light
Dirty basements, dirty noise
Dirty places coming through
Extreme worlds alone
Did you ever like it then

I would stand in line for this
There's always room in life for this

Oh baby, oh baby
Then it fell apart, it fell apart
Oh baby, oh baby
Then it fell apart, it fell apart

Extreme songs that told me
They helped me down every night
I didn't have much to say
I didn't get above the light
I closed my eyes and closed myself
And closed my world and never opened
Up to anything
That could get me along

I had to close down everything
I had to close down my mind
Too many things to cover me
Too much can make me blind
I've seen so much in so many places
So many heartaches, so many faces
So many dirty things
You couldn't even believe

I would stand in line for this
It's always good in life for this

Oh baby, oh baby
Then it fell apart, it fell apart
All day, all day
Then it fell apart, it fell apart
(Falling apart)
It's a Monday morning, it's everywhere
Oh no I can't

All day, all day
Then it fell apart, it fell apart
All day, all day
Then it fell apart, it fell apart
All day, all day
Then it fell apart, it fell apart
All day, all day
Like it always does, always does


Lyrics submitted by ruben

Extreme Ways Lyrics as written by Richard Melville Hall

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management

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Extreme Ways song meanings
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46 Comments

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  • +7
    General Comment

    Not that any opinion matters; only his; but I feel that this song represents a life style that he experienced at one time in his past that he felt was casually accepted; but not necessarily what he desired. I would akin it to the "extreme" rock star attitude of sex, clubs, musical experiences with different artists; possibly drugs; etc... Unfortunately, in the beginning, this "extreme" lifestyle was acceptable; but confusing. It was the "Color of His Sea"; The Perfect Color (Him)". It seperated his belief in what he normally accepted; from the extreme pseudo-fun lifestyle that he was experiencing. He tolerated or endured it for a while because it seemed appropriate. It some instances, he even might have embraced it. "Did you ever like it planned?" might posssibly refer to a free flowing life style that has no boundaries or structure. "Did you ever like it planned?" makes me think that spontaneity; or "a take it as it comes" attitude was prevalent during this time in his life. His "I would stand in line for this", and his "there's always room in life for this" acceptance (or sarcasm) may indicate that at that time he felt it was a great and awesome thing to experience or endure. It may have been what he thought he needed; but it soon "fell apart". Over time, I think he realized that the particular life style he was leading was not really ever what he desired (or craved). He came to a point where he had to "close down everything" towards it; or, assumptuously, get consumed by it. He saw too much ""heartache, blindness, and dirty things" to continue. Basically, his better judgment prevailed. As some have indicated, there was a sort of "resurrection", which I think the final statemnet might indicate "...always good in life for this". Possibly, he realized his life style wasn't giving him what he needed; so he changed his ways; and knew that there is also good in life for his newly selected option.

    Once again...all speculation. The lyrics and song are awesome no matter how you interpret them. I wish I had that kind of talent.

    Speculatoron March 23, 2007   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    It's abour recreating yourself I think. He's getting rid of his old way of life through drastic measures. But also he's saying it's good to have a 'renaissance'.
    "I would stand in line for this it's always good in life for this " I can see why they picked this song for the ending credits to "The Bourne Identity"

    TacticalEliteon July 23, 2002   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    Actually, nobody is correct on here. If you listen to the his concert Live from Berlin (which happens to be a free POD Cast) Moby says he wrote it about being burned out on touring. Makes sense, within that context on a lot of levels. Basically touring requires most musicians to live an extreem life style. I wouldn't want to do it. BTW...I met him at a club in DC circa 1994. He is super down to earth.

    robbelliiion October 19, 2009   Link
  • +1
    My Interpretation

    aaaaaaah i liike!! To me it means the constant "moving on" in like. shit happens "like it always does" but you just move on. no matter what you've seen or been through. Take extreme ways to move on! ha well that's my interpretation. Another good one is that life has become TOO commercial and people are just TOO FUCKIN blinded by what's cool, normal, etc. TAKE EXTREME MEASURES TO MAKE YOURSELF HAPPY. Leave everything and move on to create the world that you want for yourself. almost like fuck everything else.

    LIKEitALWAYSdoeson February 04, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    My Interpretation.... First part of the song is about him partying it up. Then his party days "fell apart" because shit was getting too real. The next part is about him taking a break from the chaos, extremities, "crazy shit" that the real world provides. He states that if he stays in isolation for too long, he could go crazy. Eventually this life style "fell apart" and he repeats the cycle.

    "I would stand in line for this" to me, he is stating that life is a roller coaster. I think he's being literal but he could be figurative. The point of a good song is that people can relate with different perspectives.

    "oh baby, oh baby" could mean that he is talking to a women he loves that he has a certain relationship with in this song

    jonezy2012on November 23, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Seems like he's looking at his life after a long stretch of self-centered depression where he became reclusive and pushed everyone away. Fitting with the theme it sounds like depression caused by a breakup, and having seen how he's been acting and where it's gotten him, he decides it's time to change.

    Without getting into every line, he explains his attitude and state of mind, sings about how he indulged in bad habits that kept him unhappy, mentions that it will likely happen again and he's ready for it, or wants to be. The second verse mentions feeling isolated and never talking to anyone about what he felt and how he got to into his unhealthy state of mind.

    The song has an overarching theme of being able to see it all though. Like he's ready for the change. That's what I see it as anyway.

    stytheon May 31, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    "I would stand in line for this" to me, he is stating that life is a roller coaster. I think he's being literal but he could be figurative. The point of a good song is that people can relate with different perspectives.

    samantha37on October 06, 2013   Link
  • +1
    My Interpretation

    What Moby's expressing is quite philosophical and poetic in this song. Ultimately, he's saying that his goals were set high, and as this is done, one can put all of their hopes and dreams into it, and in his case, it all falls apart. When one has high hopes, one wishes for their own choices as they expect. Hardships, as they came, he bypassed as he thought they were nothing. Learning a mistake somewhere, his world fell apart, after which, he had to stop and shut himself down. So the lesson to be learned, I'm sure, is to ensure you don't bite off more than you chew, as this may end at your expense. Enough speculation. I just have to say that this is a fascinating track. The way it drags your soul through it is truly breathtaking. The man is a musical Einstein. I feel that only Moby's music has quite the same effect on me.

    deadmoby5on January 13, 2014   Link
  • +1
    Song Meaning

    Well, it's a bit late to comment on this song (year 2022). However, I love this track! I know a thing or two about songwriting and one thing I can tell you about the meaning of this song is that: this beautiful work of art has no direct, nor figurative, meaning whatsoever. And the funny, but not so funny, thing is that it was written this way on purpose. The reason will shock you... (And yes, I could literally get inside this guy's head! ;) You see... I can recognize depression a mile away, for I myself have been a victim of it. Regret + Isolation = Depression In the song, Moby is not calling Baby to anyone. He is taking to himself all throughout being both sarcastic and seriously pleased about his life. I'm so glad that he found shelter in music. I did the same thing and there's no better cure!! I will forever ride this song in éxtasis.

    SongRideron September 05, 2022   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    I think this song is about alot of stuff he's seen. Alot of stuff that maybe he didn't want to see but he did anyway. And he knew that it helped him later in life. Even though it made him calloused it helped him become what he is today.

    LullabyBabyon September 11, 2002   Link

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