We're so sorry, Uncle Albert
We're so sorry if we caused you any pain
We're so sorry, Uncle Albert
But there's no one left at home
And I believe I'm gonna rain

We're so sorry but we haven't heard a thing all day
We're so sorry, Uncle Albert
But if anything should happen we'll be sure to give a ring

We're so sorry, Uncle Albert (Albert)
But we haven't done a bloody thing all day (all day)
We're so sorry, Uncle Albert (Albert)
But the kettle's on the boil and we're so easily called away

Hands across the water (water)
Heads across the sky
Hands across the water (water)
Heads across the sky

Admiral Halsey notified me
He had to have a berth or he couldn't get to sea
I had another look and I had a cup of tea and butter pie (butter pie)
The butter wouldn't melt so I put it in the pie

Hands across the water (water)
Heads across the sky
Hands across the water (water)
Heads across the sky

Live a little, be a gypsy, get around (get around)
Get your feet up off the ground
Live a little, get around
Live a little, be a gypsy, get around (get around)
Get your feet up off the ground
Live a little, get around

Hands across the water (water)
Heads across the sky
Hands across the water (water)
Heads across the sky


Lyrics submitted by Mopnugget

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey Lyrics as written by Paul Mccartney Linda Mccartney

Lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.

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Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey song meanings
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34 Comments

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  • +2
    General Comment

    I LOVE this song, brilliant! in every way!

    danger birdon July 16, 2006   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    I remember reading an article (possibly in Uncut magazine) that said that Uncle Albert was a reference the iconic character Albert Tatlock from the British TV series Coronation Street. As I understand it, Tatlock (who was usually referred to as ‘Uncle Albert’ by the other characters) was a First World War veteran who extolled the merits of hard work, honesty and moral responsibility on the younger generation. With that in mind, I always thought this song was McCartney’s way of apologising to his parents’ and grandparents’ generations for the folly and empty rhetoric of his own, particularly silly stunts like the Lennon/Ono bed-in.

    WaistbandCowboyon December 15, 2010   Link
  • +2
    Song Meaning

    McCartney said "Uncle Albert" was based on his uncle. "He's someone I recall fondly, and when the song was coming it was like a nostalgia thing."[4] McCartney also said, "As for Admiral Halsey, he's one of yours, an American admiral", referring to Admiral William "Bull" Halsey.[4]

    lolguy23on May 14, 2012   Link
  • +2
    General Comment

    To me this song is about two dual personalities, one old school and the other new, and Paul is making some kind of social commentary on the changing times. I picture Uncle Albert sitting by the fireside telling boring war stories to a younger relative (Admiral Hasley notified me...etc). Albert conquered the seas during his prime (hands across the water) and perhaps he expects the same drive and ambition from modern youth. Modern youth however lacks this type of drive (sorry we haven't done a thing all day) but excels as PSYCHONAUTS! I'll probably be lambasted for making yet another drug connection in a Mccartney song, but you can't deny the meaning of "heads across the sky". This is the new battle and modern youth wants to conquer their minds and live a little while doing it. So I guess the ultimate meaning of this song is that some kid doesn't want to sit around listening to his Uncle, so he makes excuses (it may rain, or the kettles on)to go home and get high (get your feet up off the ground). See! It all makes perfect sense! Heads vs. Hands.

    mycology101on April 20, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    this song is crazy cuz its almost like 2 songs in one....in my opnion his best after the Bealtes...better than band on the run

    themachine312on June 19, 2004   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Well they make sense in ways.

    MushieManon April 08, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Like another Paul McCartney song, "Band on the Run", this is one of those songs within a song. I like how McCartney uses two totally different melodies and meshes them together in a way that works. Lyrically, this song seems to be all over the place, but it's a great song with one of the catchiest hooks ever written. This tune takes me back to the early 70s every time I listen to it. Definitely not McCartney's best song lyrically, but surely one of his best in terms of song structure and melody.

    jimmyjango2000on November 11, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    The song is great. I have no clue what it means. Thats why I came here. Good melody, the lyrics are just great because it makes no sense. Taking a shot in the dark, but maybe his Uncle wasn't happy he joined the navy, but he thought it would be a good thing for him. Navy guys get stationed around like gypsies. idk. Still makes no sense. Oh well, lets dance.

    bigmac89on August 09, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    I remember the song when it came out on the radio (I was much much younger). Although the words made little sense, I truly enjoyed it, and really, I never get tired of hearing it. I too an very partial to the song-within-a-song style, like Band on the Run: it hearkens back the Beatles with songs like Carry That Weight/In The End.

    Major Valoron August 11, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    these are the basics according to my father who was big into the Beatles...... Uncle Albert= Albert Einstein We're so sorry about nuclear war Admiral Halsey= military agression Be a gypsy get around= leave your homeland we're going to bomb you

    cfiguc01on April 16, 2009   Link

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