I'm as corny as Kansas in August
I'm as normal as blueberry pie
No more a smart little girl with no heart
I have found me a wonderful guy

I am in a conventional dither
With a conventional star in my eye
And you will note there's a lump in my throat
When I speak of that wonderful guy

I'm as trite and as gay as a daisy in May
A cliché coming true!
I'm bromidic and bright as a moon-happy night
Pouring light on the dew!

I'm as corny as Kansas in August
High as a flag on the Fourth of July
If you'll excuse an expression I use
I'm in love, I'm in love
I'm in love, I'm in love
I'm in love with a wonderful guy!

No more a smart little girl with no heart
I have found me a wonderful guy
I'm as trite and as gay as a daisy in May
A cliché coming true
I'm bromidic and bright as a moon-happy night
Pouring light on the dew

I'm as corny as Kansas in August
High as a flag on the Fourth of July
If you'll excuse an expression I use
I'm in love, I'm in love
I'm in love, I'm in love
I'm in love with a wonderful guy!


Lyrics submitted by Mellow_Harsher

(I'm in Love With) A Wonderful Guy song meanings
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