I was walkin' down the street
Concentratin' on truckin' right
I heard a dark voice beside of me
And I looked round in a state of fright
I saw four faces one mad
A brother from the gutter
They looked me up and down a bit
And turned to each other
I say
I don't like cricket oh no
I love it
I don't like cricket oh no
I love it
Don't you walk thru my words
You got to show some respect
Don't you walk thru my words
`Cause you ain't heard me out yet
Well he looked down at my silver chain
He said I'll give you one dollar
I said you've got to be jokin' man
It was a present from me Mother
He said I like it I want it
I'll take it off your hands
And you'll be sorry you crossed me
You'd better understand that you're alone
A long way from home
And I say
I don't like reggae no no
I love it
I don't like reggae oh no
I love it
Don't you cramp me style
Don't you queer on me pitch
Don't you walk thru my words
`Cause you ain't heard me out yet
I hurried back to the swimming pool
Sinkin' pina coladas
I heard a dark voice beside me say
Would you like something harder
She said I've got it you want it
My harvest is the best
And if you try it you'll like it
And wallow in a Dreadlock Holiday
And I say
Don't like Jamaica oh no
I love her
Don't like Jamaica oh no
I love her oh yea
Don't you walk thru her words
You got to show some respect
Don't you walk thru her words
`Cause you ain't heard her out yet
I don't like cricket
I love it (Dreadlock Holiday)
I don't like reggae
I love it (Dreadlock Holiday)
Don't like Jamaica
I love her (Dreadlock Holiday)


Lyrics submitted by Ice

Dreadlock Holiday song meanings
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30 Comments

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  • +5
    General Comment

    Heh summerlr! maybe I'm wrong, but the chorus to me has always seemed really relevant to the song. When the singer is saying he loves Jamaica / cricket etc, I think he's playing the character in the story he's telling. I interpret this kind of pronouncement as an attempt to appease his aggressor by using complimentary statements of conciliation. It's just a tactful way of getting himself out of danger. What do you reckon? Quality tune anyways.

    Sheedyon October 27, 2006   Link
  • +3
    General Comment

    This is one of the most hilarious songs I've ever heard. Cracks me up every time. Is obviously about the average Englishman taking a holiday in Jamaica and although there's a difference of cultures between him and the locals they can still relate to each other by talking about cricket or having a drink or smoke etc.

    NJJon March 12, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Nobody has commented this song yet? Nothing to say about it, I love this song.

    ayaneon February 02, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Awsome song, im guessing it was about a man takin a vaction in Jamaica and getting lost

    Hassan347on December 12, 2005   Link
  • +1
    Song Meaning

    "Don't you walk through my words, you got to show some respect/'cos you ain't heard me out yet" should be obvious - he's trying to ignore someone who's addressing him in the street. Well, you would, wouldn't you, if you felt uncomfortable and a little bit menaced in a strange culture.

    The accent used is not really "broken", it's a somewhat diluted Jamaican accent used to give some flavour to the song, even though it's sung from the point of view of the English white guy. In places he's quoting what was said to him by the locals, so the accent also adds a bit of local colour there too.

    SomeOldGuyon August 10, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Re srkikid's comment: "I don't get it: if this is a song about an average Englishman on his holiday in Jamaica, how come that he speaks such a broken English?" obviously this commenter hasn't talked to a lot of poms - many non-upperclass English people say "me" instead of "my" (as do Australians). Many white guys also do refer to black guys as 'brothers" perhaps in an effort either to be cool or to be 'one world inclusive".

    Also, I always thought the words were "If you walk thru my world, You got to show some respect", which makes more sense to me than "Don't you walk thru my words You got to show some respect"

    They play this song a lot here in Australia during cricket season. But, I haven't seen the video yet! Must find it. (In general I agree with tallica and IntravenusDeMilo above, about its overall meaning.)

    AnnB99on May 16, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    'Dreadlock Holiday' is about a real holiday the lyricist took in Jamaica, with Moody Blues frontman, Justin Hayward. This can be verified on a number of sites.

    Xanadu4321on December 25, 2013   Link
  • +1
    General Comment

    Best reggae song of all time by a white group? I don't know, that's it! Also UB40 and Madness (some of their tunes).

    PeluCrespinson October 26, 2018   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    This is SOOOO GOOD!!! I think it's their best song! I share ayane's surprise; i mean generally: why aren't there more comments on songs from 10cc???

    Maebhdhon June 16, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment

    is this song called dreadlock holiday? i thought it was called i dont like cricket? awesome song though! the chorus has nothing to do with the rest of it but that makes it really funny..dont you think?

    summerlron February 08, 2006   Link

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