I am black ambition
I am always whisperin'
They keep tellin' me I will not
But my will won't listen
Gravity on a black man
With everything on his back and
His family and passion
If the doors ain't crackin'

You gotta let go (let go)
If you wanna fly, take the leap
You gotta risk it all (risk it all)
Or there'll be lots of things you'll never see
You gotta let, let go
'Cause you never know
What's in store
Mr. Entrepreneur

In this position with no choice
A system imprison young black boys
Distract with white noise
The brainwashed become hype boys
Third eye dilate
You ain't supposed to make it off Section 8
Robbin' Peter just to pay Paul
Prepare to risk everything

You need to let go (let go)
If you wanna fly, take the leap
You gotta risk it all (risk it all)
Or there'll be lots of things you'll never see
Remember, black is space
And it's the color of your face
There will be no sunny days
If Black went away

Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man

Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, black man
Black man, Black man, Black man

Don't go chasin' waterfalls
Please stick to the drip that you're used to
They don't make 'em like they used to

Uh, lies told to you
Through YouTubes and Hulus
Shows with no hues that look like you do
Black Twitter, what's that?
When Jack gets paid, do you?
For every one Gucci, support two FUBU's
Sippin' Crip-a-Cola
Consumer and a owner
'Til we all vertically integrated from the floor up
D'Ussé pour up
Sip Ace 'til I throw up
Like gang signs, 'cept I bang mines for both ya
Serial entrepreneur, we on our own
Stop sittin' around waitin' for folks to throw you a bone
If you can't buy the building, at least stock the shelf (word)
Then keep on stacking 'til you stocking for yourself, uh
See everything you place after black
Is too small a term to completely describe the act
Black nation, Black builder, Black entrepreneur
You in the presence of Black excellence and I'm on the board, Lord

Black man, Black man, Black man (ayy, Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord)
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man (God, God, God, ayy, God, ayy, God)
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man (Lord, yuh, God)
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man

Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man
Black man, Black man, Black man


Lyrics submitted by Mellow_Harsher

"Entrepreneur" as written by Pharrell L. Williams Chad Hugo

Lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Entrepreneur song meanings
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6 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentThe track sees Pharrell Williams and Jay Z tackle systemic racism in a powerful new single. It is produced by The Neptunes. Entrepreneur is Pharrell Williams and Jay Z's first collaboration since Pharrell executively produced Jay's joint album with Beyoncé titled 'Everything is Love'. Entrepreneur was released on August 21, 2020 via major streaming platforms courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment.

    What the artist means
    On this powerful track celebrating black excellence Pharrell recruits Hova in a performance for the ages. The track has booming Neptunes production and sees Mr. Williams crooning about racial protests and inequality. It's a cry for help and call for arms at the same time with the spoken word in the hook helping their cause. The production is perfectly suited for the mood of the song. As Pharrell exits Jay Z comes in and shows off his knowledge and class. He decries the lies told on social media that confuse the minds of young black people, he tells them to save up and boss up. He's waxing lyrical on this one and his voice richly merges with the hook to give the song a stage performance worthy sound. You want to be a black entrepreneur? Let these two superstars show you how to.

    What the song means to me
    There has been a significant spike in racially motivated killings since the turn of the decade, it's gotten beyond bad and now black men are scared of going out. We've seen a protest anthem from Run the Jewels, we've seen the Bigger Picture by Lil Baby and now we're getting the powerfully progressive track Entrepreneur from the great Pharrell Williams and the rap legend Jay Z. The track makes me feel eight feet tall and it reminds me that my only limitation is my mind. One for now and one for the future! I will give this song a rating of 9/10.
    ElevatorMuzakon August 21, 2020   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWow.

    If you haven’t watched this video, you’re making a big mistake. The beat is beautifully smooth, the lyrics are powerful and direct, but it is the video that got me. It was listening to ‘Black man, black man black man’ almost chanting in support while watching a seemingly never-ending collection of clips featuring black men, women, families and communities. These clips feature successful black-owned businesses from the US mostly, but also internationally. (Remember to keep watching once the credits start, there are additional international businesses )

    There has been a big push to support local black businesses (which you should), and Williams and JAY-Z did the work to feature dozens of entrepreneurs in their element. My only wish was there was a chant or more vocal support for black women, but that is the femenist in me needing to support other women. In the video, however, they work to make up for it. The music video features educators, dancers, midwifes, artists, skateboarders, bakers, app designers, chefs, entertainers, florists

    I’ve watched this video about 6 times in the past hour, not for the music but for the knowledge. I love that they put REAL knowledge in this video. One in particular sticks out, featuring Debbie Allen, the CEO of Tribe Midwifery. “Entrepreneur” highlighted the fact that “black women are 3-4 times more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications than white women”. As a mother I knew this because I am personally interested in our countries lacking care for new moms, but to see this on such a big platform is beautiful. Seeing TyAnthony Davis founding Vox collegiate Junior High for the students in his community who weren’t being served (by our disastrous education system, but that’s for another day). I love it. Thank you Pharrell Williams and JAY-Z for making this song, and this video, right now.
    ibedaveon August 21, 2020   Link
  • 0
    General CommentPharrell Williams and Jay-Z have teamed up for a new song, “Entrepreneur”. The song focuses on systemic injustices Black people face in the United States, and how tough it is to be an entrepreneur as a person of color. “Entrepreneur” showcases the systemic disadvantages and blockages people of color face in health care education, and representation. The song opens with the lyrics “I am black ambition/ I am always whispering/ … But my will won’t listen”. While it is harder for Black entrepreneurs, they will rise to meet the challenge. The song reaches its power peak with the lyrics, “If you want to fly take the leap/ You gotta risk it all”. Through economic empowerment, marginalized communities will rise. Circulating money within your community is how people of color will continue to help one another. By supporting other Black ventures and businesses, Black people will continue to gain opportunities. “Entrepreneur” is summed up with the line” For every one Gucci, support two FUBU’s.”
    Nat83on August 21, 2020   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe first feeling that comes into my mind after listening and internalizing the lyrics in this song is that anything is possible. It does not matter what others tell you, if your will is strong enough, through the blackness that is one’s entrepreneurial nature, you will breach with a brightness that will see soar through all tribulations.

    Pharell is trying to encourage the young blacks around the world and any other youthful member of the society that Covid-19 is not the end. It is an opportunity for expansion and personal growth in the business industry. Their official video shows a whole family whose children are assisting expand their family business and seeing better outcomes after leaving their jobs due to the pandemic.

    He says that you should risk it all and try to vacate the prison that the pandemic has tied us. He implores that we think outside the box “Third eye dilate”: in the video, the lyric coincides with a young man who has led to the establishment of over 20 businesses that are thriving. Jay-Z, in his words, is trying to drum support for fellow African entrepreneurs. He indicates that making it through the market is not easy, but any success is making a difference to the community, family, and to you.

    Overall, it is an inspiring song that helps rise from the darkness and black energy surrounding the pandemic and finding new means of caring and providing for those who depend on us. Start where you are and promote the community, then proceed to take over the world. Best entrepreneur motor!
    BoseBose2001on August 21, 2020   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is the personification of black excellence and creativity when we have little to work with from an economic standpoint. The song provides a history lesson and inspiration for future black entrepreneurs to realize that they can own the intellectual property they create on social media platforms like twitter and Facebook. Since historically blacks have not owned any real big money white corporations, we can benefit from coming together and sharing our own resources to make more money.

    My opinion on this song is that it is a good and inspirational vibe reminiscent of the socially conscious lyrics of Marvin Gaye or Grandmaster Flash back in the day. Even though we are oppressed as black creative people, we do not have to be in competition with each other economically. There is enough of the money pie for all and ultra rich whites that own these firms have proven to us that the model works in America.

    The lyrics make reference to the black Twitter world and the way that we brag about “owning” that but Jack Dorsey is the one getting paid from all of that. This lyric is kind of a flashback to Kanye West lyric on All Falls Down song that says “ buying Gucci but the white man get paid of all that”. The lyrics stress the importance of ownership and personal accountability to ourselves to be all that we can be in a racist world.
    ibedaveon August 21, 2020   Link
  • 0
    General CommentPharrell just came out with a new song called “Entrepreneur” featuring Jay-Z. I will listen to anything that has Jay on it. Pharrell is a hit or miss for me. I get he is a genius. I understand why he is so amazing. I will not deny his talent and drive. It’s just that about half of his songs I can only listen to once or twice. That being said, I was excited to hear how this song would work with these two, seeing as how it’s been awhile since their last collaboration.

    I gave the lyrics a read through before I listened to the song. I didn’t look up anything about it before I listened so I wouldn’t have any notions in my head. The lyrics themselves are so great. The verses are filled with emotion about being Black in this country. You can just feel Pharrell’s feelings ooze through when you read them.

    I really thought the song would be more rough, the beat and melody a bit harder. The song starts with Pharrell whispering the first verse, and then his whispers his other verse. At first I didn’t like that, but after the second listen I thought Pharrell was trying to show that Black voices are really hard to hear in this country right now. We have to strain to listen to them. They aren’t being heard as loudly as they should be. I didn’t care for the whispering though.

    Jay-Z’s verse was everything that I thought it would be. I absolutely loved it. I know it’s about Black Lives Matter, but the bit “sittin' around waitin' for folks to throw you a bone. If you can't buy the building at least stock the shelf (Word). Then keep on stackin' 'til you stockin' for yourself, uh” I think can hit the heart of a lot of people right now. Also “shows with no hues that look like you do” is such a part of our culture right now. Trying to make sure every single person is represented. Making sure all voices are heard, that there is an equal opportunity is very much where we are at.

    Now, the song itself, not so much. I just didn’t like most of it. The beat was fine. I can almost get over the whispering of Pharrell’s verses. The parts where he just says “Black man” over and over again was fine. The rest though, it was almost too busy. I know he likes to put funk in his work and his songs all have their original thing. I just found this one to be a bit too much with the layering. There was so much over the actual song it was hard to hear it. Then I thought maybe that was intentional, that Pharrell was trying to show how hard it’s been for Black voices to be heard. I don’t know if I’m reading into it something that’s not there, and he just thought it sounded good. It just didn’t work for me. The lyrics yes, so much yes. The sounds itself of the song, no, not really.
    ibedaveon August 25, 2020   Link

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