Down beneath the spectacle of free
No one ever lets you see
The Citizen King
Ruling the fantastic architecture of the burning cities
Where we buy and sell
La la la la la la la la la la la la
That the Snark was a Boojum all can tell
But a rose is a rose is a rose
Said the Mama of Dada as long ago as 1919

You make arrangements with the guard
Halfway round the exercise yard
To sugar the pill
Disguising the enormous
Double-time the king pays to Wordsworth
More than you or I could reasonably forfeit to buy...
Double-time the king pays to Wordsworth
More than you or I could reasonably buy...
If we live (we live) to tread on dead kings
Or else we'll work to live to buy the things we multiply
Until they fill the ordered universe.

Down beneath the spectacle of free
No one ever lets you see
The Citizen King
Ruling the fantastic architecture of the burning cities
Where we buy and sell
La la la la la la la la la la la la
That the Snark was a Boojum all can tell
But a rose is a rose is a rose
Said the Mama of Dada as long ago as 1919....


Lyrics submitted by razajac, edited by AmitAmely

The Nine Funerals of the Citizen King song meanings
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    General CommentReally like the line "That the Snark was a Boojum / All can tell."
    ;
    If you read the poem, it's pretty obvious what Henry Cow is getting at: We're told that being nice, well-behaved, and conducive to the designs of Western Civ and its bankers and other elites is a Good Thing; which is like hunting the Snark.

    But in Carroll's poem, the Snark they pursue turns out to a Boojum. And that means the complete, eternal anhillation of the hunter's being.

    In other words, this is Henry Cow's way of saying that we're being sold a bill of goods.
    razajacon February 08, 2017   Link

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