"Good Morning Britain" as written by and Roddy Frame....
Jock's got a vote in Parochia
Ten long years and he's still got her
Paying tax and and doing stir
Worry about it later.
And the wind blows hot and the wind blows cold
But it blows us good so we've been told
Music's food 'til the art-biz folds
Let them all eat culture.

Chorus:
The past is steeped in shame,
But tomorrow's fair game,
For a life that's fit for living
Good morning Britain.

Twenty years and a loaded gun
Funerals, fear and the war ain't won
Paddy's just a figure of fun
It lightens up the danger.
And a corporal sneers at a catholic boy
And he eyes his gun like a rich man's toy
He's killing more than celtic joy
Death is not a stranger.

Taffy's time's gonna come one day
It's a loud sweet voice and it won't give way
A house is not a holiday
Your sons are leaving home Neil.
In the hills and the valleys and far away
You can hear the song of democracy
The echo of eternity
With a Rak-a-Rak-a feel.

Chorus

From the Tyne to where to the Thames does flow
My English brothers and sisters know
It's not a case of where you go
It's race and creed and colour.
From the police cell to the deep dark grave
On the underground's just a stop away
Don't be too black, don't be too gay
Just get a little duller.

But in this green and pleasant land,
Where I make my home, I make my stand
Make it cool just to be a man,
A uniform's a traitor.
Love is international
And if you stand or if you fall,
Just let them know you gave your all,
Worry about it later.

Chorus


Lyrics submitted by shewouldnt

"Good Morning Britain" as written by Roddy Frame

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Good Morning Britain song meanings
Add your thoughts

6 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +2
    General CommentI can shed some light on parts of this song:

    "Twenty years and a loaded gun
    Funerals, fear and the war ain't won"

    This is referring to the troubles in Ireland where the Republican community fought a guerilla campaign for a united Ireland opposed to being run by Britain. Lots of lives lost on both sides of the conflict. The PIRA campaign had been at a high for ~20 years at the time I believe.
    "Paddy's just a figure of fun
    It lightens up the danger."

    'Paddys' a derogatory term for the Irish. Their are lots of Anti-Irish jokes. The songs saying it's used to hide a fear of the population.

    "And a corporal sneers at a catholic boy
    And he eyes his gun like a rich man's toy
    He's killing more than celtic joy
    Death is not a stranger."

    Republicans were often from and supported by the catholic community for reasons beyond the scope of this comment. State institutions such as the police (RUC) and the Army had an institutionalised hatred of republicans and there was a lot of anti-catholic prejudice. The song here is saying that the sneer from a corporal is doing more then upsetting an Irish person, it's adding to the cycle of violence. The young boys looking at the gun and remembering the hate towards himself.

    "Taffy's time's gonna come one day
    It's a loud sweet voice and it won't give way"

    Taffy is a derogatory term for the Welsh. Modern Wales hasn't been as active with independence from Britain as Scotland or Ireland, but Aztec Camera is claiming it will happen.

    "A house is not a holiday"

    One thing that has caused tensions to rise in Wales is holiday homes. Many welsh couldn't and can't buy homes in the areas they grew up while wealthy people by holiday homes in the area that they only stay in for a small portion of the year.

    "Your sons are leaving home Neil."

    No idea, why I came here. Reply if you know please."

    "In the hills and the valleys and far away
    You can hear the song of democracy
    The echo of eternity
    With a Rak-a-Rak-a feel."

    Scotland, Wales and Ireland are famous for their valleys and hills. I assume the Rak-a-Rak is the imitation of an automatic weapon, implying democracy via violence.
    CultureShock2on December 28, 2015   Link
  • +1
    General Commentcan't believe theres not more comments
    JeffKaos71on July 19, 2010   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationI've loved this song since it came out and, after hearing it on the radio this morning, thought I would have a look into its meaning and was surprised to find that there was little about. Anyway, here are my thoughts - feel free to disagree if you want.

    The song is split into the countries of the UK. Verse 1 is a reflection of Scotland (Jocks). 'Ten long years and he's still got her' I take to be a reflection of Margaret Thatcher's rule and that being in 'Parochia', Scotland is seen as something of an irrelevance. Could also be some reflection of Edinburgh's position as one of the UK's cultural capital and that it's all well and good, but it doesn't put food on plates.

    Second verse reflects Northern Ireland and I would echo the earlier writer's comments about the Troubles. The song was released in 1990 so the 20 year comment ties in with the start of the Troubles. 'Paddy's just a figure of fun' comments on the fact that the Irish are often the butt of British jokes.

    Third verse reflects Wales (Taffy). 'Loud sweet voice' is a comment on the male voice choirs of Wales. The Neil in the song must refer to Neil Kinnock who was Welsh leader of the opposition at the time (also a male voice choir singer).

    Verse four covers (more loosely) England and verse 5 brings them all together in optimism, with the songs uplifting comments on giving your all. The chorus does the same by reflecting on the past whilst saying that the future can be different.

    One final point. I can't help thinking that the 'Worry about it later' line is a knowing nod to the lyrics of Complete Control by The Clash (Mick Jones' former band). The way in which they are sung is similar in both - especially the lengthened 'a' in later.
    roybison February 18, 2016   Link
  • 0
    General Commentwhat an awesome song!
    Soldier_of_Funkon September 13, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI remember this being played by GMTV or TVAM and thinking it was real good :o)
    Fitting time to hear it too.
    Reading the lyrics I like the Taffy`s "time is gonna come" being a Taffy myself ;o)
    Looking to the future and brighter times etc...
    Makes me a bit sad it was done in the 90`s pre 9/11 and all that happened afterwards.
    Ah well. This song gets the thumbs up from me!
    gooeyblobon September 10, 2010   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationThe lyrics are very clever the more you learn about them. The line 'And the wind blows hot and the wind blows cold' references the dreadful 'Scottish' song Donald Where's Your Troosers, sung by the kilt-wearing Andy Stewart in the days when The White Heather Club was TV's idea of Scottish culture.
    Meg1234on October 27, 2016   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain