Oh, oh, oh, yeah
Oh, oh, oh, yeah

I used to want to change the world
In brotherhood, us two
But now my friend I only want to save it
From you

I bid farewell to those lonely days
Breaking my back for you to siphon my veins
The masters will now return
To the (hands of the slaves)
And we'll spin them reel to reel
So that every single time you hear
This soundtrack of the voiceless
You'll know the end is drawing near
Can I say you were ever a friend to me? No
Can I say you were ever a friend to me? No
Can I say you were ever a friend to me? No
Now, you know, now, you know


Lyrics submitted by dceffex

"The Great Golden Gate Disaster" as written by Andrew Schwab Alexander Albert

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management

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The Great Golden Gate Disaster song meanings
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3 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentThis is Project 86's anger song toward the record company that cut them (Atlantic I think). It's a song of realization that they made a mistake trying to become famous through one of the vampire corporate giants.

    It's also about the little guy sticking it to the man in some ways. Not the most Christian song, but still it's honest and from Andrew's heart, which is what makes Project such a good band.
    Skillet7on January 26, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt sounds far too religious to be just against Atlantic. Considering lyrics like

    "The fallen son that bought our freedom
    Is the I, the I that had to die"

    and

    "Outside you there's a remedy
    A destiny in identity"

    I think it's speaking to the So-Called Emperor. Many of P86's songs are defiant of some Unseen, Unspoken Power, just like this one. Consider Stein's Theme, The Spy Hunter, and especially A Text Message to the So-Called Emperor and Solace.
    Consider the meaning of controlling your impulse for taking violent revenge on your enemies that was conveyed in My Will Be a Dead Man. I can't believe they would chew out Atlantic beyond Breakdown in 3/4. And Breakdown in 3/4 wasn't quite as defiant as this song; it was more like sarcastically saying "We'll see how well we do without you now" (and I think it fits the bill as an address to Atlantic).
    I think highly defiant songs like this, though, one are reserved for the Unseen Power of the earth.
    thrustaeon February 12, 2009   Link
  • 0
    Song MeaningThis sounds as if is God speaking directly to Satan. Satan was once an angel (Reference: Ezekiel 28:12-17, Isaiah 14:12)

    "I used to want to change the world
    In brotherhood, us two
    But now my friend I only want to save it
    From you"
    skillabr1832on March 28, 2010   Link

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