GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE
GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE TODAY IS SUCH A DAY TO BE ALIVE
WE ARE INFLUENTAL ELECTION IS PRESIDENTIAL
OUR IMAGE IS ESSENTIAL OUR METHODS CONFIDENTIAL
MORE MORE MORE MORE AND MORE
GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE
GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE TODAY IS SUCH A DAY TO BE ALIVE
WE ARE GETTING LARGER WE HAVE RIGHT TO THINE
PERHAPS A COMPANY MERGER CONGLOMERATE DESIGN
WE EXPAND WORLD OVER BUSINESS DOING FINE
OUR HEADS EXPANDING FURTHER
MORE MORE MORE MORE AND MORE
GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE
GREATEST GOD'S DIVINE EXHAUSTING ALL THE WORLD INTO DECLINE
DIVINE DIVINE DIVINE DIVINE


Lyrics submitted by i_feel_sick

Greatest God's Divine song meanings
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Gentle Hour
Yo La Tengo
This song was originally written by a guy called Peter Gutteridge. He was one of the founders of the "Dunedin Sound" a musical scene in the south of New Zealand in the early 80s. From there it was covered by "The Clean" one of the early bands of that scene (he had originally been a member of in it's early days, writing a couple of their best early songs). The Dunedin sound, and the Clean became popular on american college radio in the mid to late 80s. I guess Yo La Tengo heard that version. Great version of a great song,
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No Surprises
Radiohead
Same ideas expressed in Fitter, Happier are expressed in this song. We're told to strive for some sort of ideal life, which includes getting a good job, being kind to everyone, finding a partner, getting married, having a couple kids, living in a quiet neighborhood in a nice big house, etc. But in Fitter, Happier the narrator(?) realizes that it's incredibly robotic to live this life. People are being used by those in power "like a pig in a cage on antibiotics"--being pacified with things like new phones and cool gadgets and houses while being sucked dry. On No Surprises, the narrator is realizing how this life is killing him slowly. In the video, his helmet is slowly filling up with water, drowning him. But he's so complacent with it. This is a good summary of the song. This boring, "perfect" life foisted upon us by some higher powers (not spiritual, but political, economic, etc. politicians and businessmen, perhaps) is not the way to live. But there is seemingly no way out but death. He'd rather die peacefully right now than live in this cage. While our lives are often shielded, we're in our own protective bubbles, or protective helmets like the one Thom wears, if we look a little harder we can see all the corruption, lies, manipulation, etc. that is going on in the world, often run by huge yet nearly invisible organizations, corporations, and 'leaders'. It's a very hopeless song because it reflects real life.
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Page
Ed Sheeran
There aren’t many things that’ll hurt more than giving love a chance against your better judgement only to have your heart crushed yet again. Ed Sheeran tells such a story on “Page.” On this track, he is devastated to have lost his lover and even more saddened by the feeling that he may never move on from this.
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Sunglasses at Night
Corey Hart
In the 1980s, sunglasses were a common fashion for people who wanted to adopt a "tough guy" persona (note all the cop shows from that era -- Simon & Simon, Miami Vice, etc. -- where the lead characters wore shades). So I think this song is about a guy who wears shades as a way of hiding his insecurity after learning that his girlfriend is cheating on him. He's trying to pretend that he's a "tough guy" to hide the fact that his girlfriend's affair is disturbing him.
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Indigo
Of Mice & Men
This track is about is about questioning why the sky would choose to be blue if it had the choice to be anything else, “blue also meaning sad,” states frontman Aaron Pauley. “It's about comforting a loved one in a time of loss by telling them you feel blue, too.”