Driving down the concrete beams
Looking around and it now seems
Mama earth is nowhere
Gone from your eyes

Hidden in the crust
Of man's scientific dreams
She is gone

Natural man took her natural face
Made it a strange and alien place
You can't bear to look
'Cause she ain't there

Our mother has been raped
And left to die in disgrace
She is gone


Lyrics submitted by Demau Senae

Mother Lyrics as written by Robert William Lamm

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, Spirit Music Group, Songtrust Ave, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

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Mother song meanings
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    General Comment
    I like the first minute or so, as well as the last, but I don't care a whole lot for the horn fusion in between.
    Mattbluhalofanon July 18, 2007   Link

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