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Pantera – By Demons Be Driven Lyrics 12 days ago
@[the:43559] painkiller I wouldn't really know but there is no mention of any 6th dimension anywhere in the Bible. Going by the secular understanding of 6th dimension it would enable a degree of interdimensional travel from one reality to another. Maybe that's what he was talking about, I don't know though.

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Pantera – By Demons Be Driven Lyrics 12 days ago
@[guess21:43558] no junk no soul

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Heart – All I Want to Do Is Make Love to You Lyrics 2 months ago
And didn't this woman think her infertile husband would notice that baby bump and lack of menstruation after a few months? The barfing in the morning? The kicking? He might have some questions eventually! Either the husband sanctioned this or she did NOT think this thing through.

Then later, oops, she bumps into the father! Was the husband there? AWKWARD! I know it's probably just going for touchy-feely and whimsy but dang, this scenario was not at all thought out.

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Heart – All I Want to Do Is Make Love to You Lyrics 2 months ago
The woman in the narrative here wants a baby, but her husband is incapable for whatever reason. Her solution: find a doctor? Visit a fertility clinic? Nope. Fuck a stranger. Brilliant. Great message for the kids.

At least the sex was good (you brought the woman out in me, so many times easily). So we know she got off 10-20 times or so, that's good. How different would this song be if it had been lousy sex?

You came in ten seconds,
Blowing out so easily,
Then you fell asleep farting.

I guess she probably wouldn't have written the song then. Also what exactly is this woman doing at this hotel all the time? I'm not at all prude, but I mean hell, Maude and Jeffrey Lebowski made it happen in a way that was more morally upright than the scenario described in this song. Let that sink in for a minute.

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Bette Midler – The Rose Lyrics 1 year ago
This song is depressing and makes me want to kill myself.

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Boston – Foreplay/Long Time Lyrics 2 years ago
I came VERY close to submitting these lyrics verbatim as my resignation letter from my last job.

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GWAR – Maggots Lyrics 2 years ago
@[Abraxus:32248] No, that's idiotic

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GWAR – Maggots Lyrics 2 years ago
@[OllieTheMeek:32247] Now in the halls of the necro lord
flash of fear when he sees my sword, I
rape his woman, smoke his bong
leave a booger underneath his throne

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The Monkees – Porpoise Song (Theme from Head) Lyrics 2 years ago
I cannot talk about the meaning of this song without also talking about the film Head, but looked at in this context they illuminate one another in startling clarity.

This criminally underrated film, released in 1968 as the last "hurrah" for the Monkees, was intended to be end of the idea of the Monkees. Their career was on a rapid, stupefying decline. What they created was an epic acid trip, a bitter criticism of mass media and pop culture, and a surreal deconstruction of the IDEA of The Monkees--thus alienating the fans of the original show, and with the baggage inherent in BEING the Monkees, the young adult philosopher & artist crowd were unlikely to take interest. With a shoestring budget and poor marketing, it failed utterly in the box office. I was first turned on to this film by a friend of mine almost 10 years ago and it has yet to stop fascinating me.

This film is many things, and the story surrounding it is as important as its content. As you peel away its layers, it reveals more and more to you. Some of the puzzle pieces actually require some research, and I have no doubt that there is more to be understood about this film than what I currently know of.

On the most superficial surface layer, it appears to just be The Monkees being silly with significant format changes from the show. Presented are a series of disconnected sketches that could plausibly have been part of the serial, although edgier. It is technically an extended Monkees episode--gag driven sketch comedy, absurd, and inflatable (riding the backs of giraffes is alright for a while—but implicitly, not forever).

However, when you deflate the film you are surprised to find that, unlike the TV show, it actually is not empty, and you get to the essence of what this film actually is. The Monkees were, in the film's own words, "a manufactured image with no philosophies," its artistic choices were dictated by corporate committee, and, legions of misguided Monkey-haters to the contrary, they had incredible talent. For some reason, perhaps lack of education, people projected this frustration on to the four guys themselves and mocked them mercilessly, which is a fundamental misunderstanding of media culture. Yes, the Monkees project is manufactured. The four individuals themselves, however, were innocent pawns.

I have a difficult time understanding why people never got that; continue to not get it.

Knowing this was thier last hurrah, they recklessly deconstructed their own image. So here we have this motif of a self-aware fictional band put through manufactured situations attempting to become real. (Wanting to be, to feel and to see). The underlying desire to be legitimate colors everything in this film. It is absolutely futile. Even if corporate media would allow it, the public wouldn't. Soon they are trying to break out, tearing up costumes, breaking the fourth wall, walking off set, waking up dead extras, any rule of cinema you can think of was broken. They individually tried, in futility, to break from character. Davie tries in vein to become a boxer, but it's just a publicity stunt. Mickey Dolenz tears off the fake arrows and kicks over the fake set to no avail. Peter's the dummy. He's always the dummy. Look through the metaphor. As human beings, artists, they were trying to break free from the image that they themselves were fictitious. (A face, a voice, an image cannot rejoice). They set out to accomplish this with the mentality that it was hopeless, I suspect. They get so desperate they actually start committing acts of war (blowing up the Coke machine, a simple but effective statement about corporate sponsorship), murder, and finally they commit suicide by jumping off a bridge. Even then it is not enough for them to break free of the image that's been created for them. Their deaths were just another scene for the film, and they are simply put in a tank and hauled off to storage for the next production.

Another layer to this film concerns some of its symbolism. The all-encompassing box represented their confinement both by pop culture and by their hateful director who forced them to break/lunch in a tiny room not unlike the Head box. They feel like marionettes being made to dance for their puppeteer's pleasure, forced to carry on this charade. This is why the only place in the film free will is discussed or even considered is in the box. (Wanting to feel To know what is real Living is a, is a lie.)

The final example I'll bring up--the list goes on but possibly the most telling, is the appearance of industry people in the film. If the party is watched frame by frame, you can see the director showing himself holding the camera in the mirror. And Victor Mature appears as a Godlike figure towering over the four, kicking them around. The sequences that include Head's staff in these contexts remove any doubt as to what this film is really all about. ((The ego) sings of castles And kings and things that go With a life of style.)

They knew there was no chance whatsoever of this film ever receiving the recognition it deserved, and 40 years later that appears to still be true. But this mentality was huge to the underlying meaning behind this film, and what they actually were able to do with it. The Monkees at some point ceased to feel like people and started to feel like products. This film is an expression of the bitterness and resent created by the situation they were forced into and the people that forced them into it, and in a sense a triumph that their true selves finally came through and real art was created--against the most impossible of odds. In the end, real expression was accomplished and the Monkees project matured.

What the whole Monkees project, capped off with this film, accomplished, belongs with Andy Warhol and his multicolored photocopied Marilyn Monroes, and any number of likeminded self-indulgent postmodern/pop culture deconstructionist artists forced down the throat of every art student since 1970.

There is no other pop group before or since that could have created such a scathing, incisive criticism of media and popular culture. The factors that came together to create this situation, and subsequently, "Head," are completely unique and I highly doubt they would ever happen again.

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