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U2 – With or Without You Lyrics 3 months ago
He can't live with the UNCERTAINTY of not knowing where he stands -- i.e., the WAITING to find out ("On a bed of nails she makes me wait"). He's already done everything he can to win her; there's nothing more he do ("My hands are tied"). So he's stuck waiting.

He obviously wants her, but he could probably move on from a final rejection. It's the uncertainty of not knowing where she stands has him unable to function ("I can't live"). He might win her, but she might be stringing him along; he cannot deal with the uncertainty of not knowing the ultimate outcome.

Since he doesn't know where he stands, he has to (mentally and emotionally) prepare for both possibilities -- i.e., moving on "With or without you". It's too difficult to simultaneously live with both possibilities. In evoking two contrary possibilities, the phrase "With or without you" is reminiscent of "Schrodinger's cat" (where a single cat is both dead AND alive until someone looks at the cat).

The difficulty of uncertainty is not unique to romance. For example, someone might be waiting to hear back from an employer regarding a prospective job. Perhaps the job is geographically remote and has a much higher salary and prestige level, but also would require some further training. The job candidate wants to know ASAP if he/she got the job -- so that he/she can move forward with geographic relocation, along with a new income level and career path -- and can begin the necessary new training. But the potential employer keeps making him/her wait for an answer. At some point, the job candidate just wants a YES or NO, either way -- and desires CLOSURE above all else. The job candidate can't live "with or without you" -- with "you" being the employer. It's too mentally taxing to have the uncertainty of not knowing your fate. You can't plan ahead to the next week, the next month, etc., because the life possibilities are so radically different -- depending on whether you get the new job. The feeling of UNCERTAINTY is what this song is about, at least when I hear it.

If she wants to be with him, then he can happily live "with" her. If she rejects him, then he will suffer temporary anguish but he can ultimately move on and live "without" her -- as he will have no other choice. But it's the limbo of having to simultaneously (and for a prolonged period of time) deal with both possibilities ("With or without you") that is too much for him to bear. That's my take

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Disturbed – The Sound of Silence (Simon & Garfunkel cover) Lyrics 2 years ago
I've already posted on lyrics (see above)... but the Disturbed version is also notable, in that it builds dramatically: Draiman's tone is softer and more mellow, until it becomes more forceful with "Fools..." -- and then again becomes even more forceful, almost rage, with "And the people bowed and prayed..." This brilliantly mirrors the lyrics of the frustrated prophet, whose words are unheard ("But my words, like silent raindrops fell And echoed in the wells of silence") -- so that, by the end, he is yelling in order to try to break through and have his message heard and heeded...

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Disturbed – The Sound of Silence (Simon & Garfunkel cover) Lyrics 2 years ago
@[tigerx2374:12565] Great interpretation. Not sure it's the only interpretation -- for example, what about SILENCE just in isolated self-absorption (staring a smart phone ignoring everyone in real life), without a major social justice issue? But even if your is not the ONLY interpretation, still it's a very forceful interpretation -- very astute.

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Simon and Garfunkel – The Sounds of Silence [#] Lyrics 2 years ago
Simon&Garfunkel’s prophetic vision of a modern fragmented society of isolated people, alluding to Psalm 135:

The song’s narrator has received prophesy, in an essentially passive process: “Because a vision softly creeping / Left its seeds while I was sleeping / And the vision that was planted in my brain.” The narrator is like a prophet, a recipient of knowledge that he does not claim to have created.

In fact, the song expressly mentions prophets: “And the sign said, ‘The words of the prophets / Are written on the subway walls / And tenement halls.’ / And whisper'd in the sounds of silence.” In this modern society (of “neon lights” and “the neon god”), the words of prophets are overlooked and relegated to below-ground graffiti (“subway walls”) and destitute (“tenement halls”) – just as prophets were overlooked in past societies.

The prophecy is similar/allusive to Psalm 135:

Song: "People talking without speaking, / People hearing without listening". Compare to Psalm 135: “They have mouths, but do not speak; they have eyes, but do not see; they have ears, but do not hear”. Not exactly the same words, but certainly similar ideas.

Song: “And the people bowed and prayed / To the neon god they made.” Compare to Psalm 135: “The idols of the nations are silver and gold, the work of human hands. . . . Those who make them become like them, so do all who trust in them.”

Yet the narrator is a prophet who can’t reach his audience: “’Fools’ said I, ‘You do not know / Silence like a cancer grows. / Hear my words that I might teach you, / Take my arms that I might reach you.’ / But my words like silent raindrops fell, / And echoed / In the wells of silence.”

And so the song itself is a plea to break through the silence and finally reach is audience. Unable to otherwise reach them, he has crafted this melodic plea.… Does it work? That depends on us, the audience…. Is it possible that we hear and appreciate the words and melody, while missing the larger ideas? Or, in some cases, does this song help to actually break through the silence and resonate to convey its message? Either way, it’s a brilliant song….

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Simon and Garfunkel – The Sounds of Silence Lyrics 2 years ago
Simon&Garfunkel’s prophetic vision of a modern fragmented society of isolated people, alluding to Psalm 135:

The song’s narrator has received prophesy, in an essentially passive process: “Because a vision softly creeping / Left its seeds while I was sleeping / And the vision that was planted in my brain.” The narrator is like a prophet, a recipient of knowledge that he does not claim to have created.

In fact, the song expressly mentions prophets: “And the sign said, ‘The words of the prophets / Are written on the subway walls / And tenement halls.’ / And whisper'd in the sounds of silence.” In this modern society (of “neon lights” and “the neon god”), the words of prophets are overlooked and relegated to below-ground graffiti (“subway walls”) and destitute (“tenement halls”) – just as prophets were overlooked in past societies.

The prophecy is similar/allusive to Psalm 135:

Song: "People talking without speaking, / People hearing without listening". Compare to Psalm 135: “They have mouths, but do not speak; they have eyes, but do not see; they have ears, but do not hear”. Not exactly the same words, but certainly similar ideas.

Song: “And the people bowed and prayed / To the neon god they made.” Compare to Psalm 135: “The idols of the nations are silver and gold, the work of human hands. . . . Those who make them become like them, so do all who trust in them.”

Yet the narrator is a prophet who can’t reach his audience: “’Fools’ said I, ‘You do not know / Silence like a cancer grows. / Hear my words that I might teach you, / Take my arms that I might reach you.’ / But my words like silent raindrops fell, / And echoed / In the wells of silence.”

And so the song itself is a plea to break through the silence and finally reach is audience. Unable to otherwise reach them, he has crafted this melodic plea.… Does it work? That depends on us, the audience…. Is it possible that we hear and appreciate the words and melody, while missing the larger ideas? Or, in some cases, does this song help to actually break through the silence and resonate to convey its message? Either way, it’s a brilliant song….

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Simon and Garfunkel – Sounds of Silence Lyrics 2 years ago
Simon&Garfunkel’s prophetic vision of a modern fragmented society of isolated people, alluding to Psalm 135:

The song’s narrator has received prophesy, in an essentially passive process: “Because a vision softly creeping / Left its seeds while I was sleeping / And the vision that was planted in my brain.” The narrator is like a prophet, a recipient of knowledge that he does not claim to have created.

In fact, the song expressly mentions prophets: “And the sign said, ‘The words of the prophets / Are written on the subway walls / And tenement halls.’ / And whisper'd in the sounds of silence.” In this modern society (of “neon lights” and “the neon god”), the words of prophets are overlooked and relegated to below-ground graffiti (“subway walls”) and destitute (“tenement halls”) – just as prophets were overlooked in past societies.

The prophecy is similar/allusive to Psalm 135:

Song: "People talking without speaking, / People hearing without listening". Compare to Psalm 135: “They have mouths, but do not speak; they have eyes, but do not see; they have ears, but do not hear”. Not exactly the same words, but certainly similar ideas.

Song: “And the people bowed and prayed / To the neon god they made.” Compare to Psalm 135: “The idols of the nations are silver and gold, the work of human hands. . . . Those who make them become like them, so do all who trust in them.”

Yet the narrator is a prophet who can’t reach his audience: “’Fools’ said I, ‘You do not know / Silence like a cancer grows. / Hear my words that I might teach you, / Take my arms that I might reach you.’ / But my words like silent raindrops fell, / And echoed / In the wells of silence.”

And so the song itself is a plea to break through the silence and finally reach is audience. Unable to otherwise reach them, he has crafted this melodic plea.… Does it work? That depends on us, the audience…. Is it possible that we hear and appreciate the words and melody, while missing the larger ideas? Or, in some cases, does this song help to actually break through the silence and resonate to convey its message? Either way, it’s a brilliant song….

submissions
Disturbed – The Sound of Silence (Simon & Garfunkel cover) Lyrics 2 years ago
Simon&Garfunkel’s prophetic vision of a modern fragmented society of isolated people, alluding to Psalm 135:

The song’s narrator has received prophesy, in an essentially passive process: “Because a vision softly creeping / Left its seeds while I was sleeping / And the vision that was planted in my brain.” The narrator is like a prophet, a recipient of knowledge that he does not claim to have created.

In fact, the song expressly mentions prophets: “And the sign said, ‘The words of the prophets / Are written on the subway walls / And tenement halls.’ / And whisper'd in the sounds of silence.” In this modern society (of “neon lights” and “the neon god”), the words of prophets are overlooked and relegated to below-ground graffiti (“subway walls”) and destitute (“tenement halls”) – just as prophets were overlooked in past societies.

The prophecy is similar/allusive to Psalm 135:

Song: "People talking without speaking, / People hearing without listening". Compare to Psalm 135: “They have mouths, but do not speak; they have eyes, but do not see; they have ears, but do not hear”. Not exactly the same words, but certainly similar ideas.

Song: “And the people bowed and prayed / To the neon god they made.” Compare to Psalm 135: “The idols of the nations are silver and gold, the work of human hands. . . . Those who make them become like them, so do all who trust in them.”

Yet the narrator is a prophet who can’t reach his audience: “’Fools’ said I, ‘You do not know / Silence like a cancer grows. / Hear my words that I might teach you, / Take my arms that I might reach you.’ / But my words like silent raindrops fell, / And echoed / In the wells of silence.”

And so the song itself is a plea to break through the silence and finally reach is audience. Unable to otherwise reach them, he has crafted this melodic plea.… Does it work? That depends on us, the audience…. Is it possible that we hear and appreciate the words and melody, while missing the larger ideas? Or, in some cases, does this song help to actually break through the silence and resonate to convey its message? Either way, it’s a brilliant song….

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Tom Petty – Free Fallin' Lyrics 3 years ago
As an addendum to the prior comment, my interpretation makes the song somewhat similar (in overall meaning) to the song Cat's In the Crade.

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Tom Petty – Free Fallin' Lyrics 3 years ago
My interpretation is that this song is about a father who moved out when his daughter was young -- and now (at seeing her grow up) he feels a mixture of sadness and fatherly pride.

He opens by saying that she "loves her mama". Why no mention of her father (or her parents) ? Because she doesn't have much of a relationship with her father, since he left when she was young. In addition to her mother, she also "loves ... Jesus[,] ...America[,]...horses and her boyfriend too" and is "crazy 'bout Elvis". This is a pretty long list of loves -- conspicuously absent is her father (as he has been absent for most of her life).

Also, does she really "love[] horses" at the same time as she has a "boyfriend"? Or instead (more likely) is the narrator remembering a time when she was much younger and loved horses (which is more typical of girls when they are younger, before they have boyfriends) ? He remembers her love for horses from when he was more involved in her life (perhaps even before he left her mother).

It's especially important that she "loves ... her boyfriend". She is idealistic, believing in the type of relationship that her parents couldn't maintain in the long-term. If the narrator were in love with her (romantically), then he would probably be bitter/competitive about her love for her boyfriend. But he never says anything hostile about her boyfriend -- and never mentions him again. Her boyfriend is insignificant, b/c the narrator is her father, not a romantic rival.

"It's a long day living in Reseda [/] There's a freeway runnin' through the yard". This is about the San Fernando Valley -- a suburban domesticated area where parents move to raise their kids, away from the excitement and glamour of the city (LA/Hollywood). The Valley is a just a boring suburban destination (a means to the end of child-rearing) -- so "there's a freeway runnin' through the yard" (traveling to the city, where the real life is found). "It's a long day" in the Valley, because life is so boring there (in the suburbs). The narrator just couldn't make the sacrifice of living a suburban domesticated existence. So he left the girl's mother.

"I'm a bad boy 'cause I don't even miss her [/] I'm a bad boy for breakin' her heart." He doesn't "miss her", in the sense that he just couldn't make the sacrifice of living a humdrum suburban boring life in order to raise her. He doesn't regret his decision to leave. But he obviously misses her in the sense that he has feelings about her -- why else would he later say that he "want[s] to write her name in the sky"? He "br[o]k[e] her heart" when he moved away in her childhood, leaving her to grow up without her father. It's intentionally ironic that he calls himself "a bad boy", when he is old enough to be the father of a teenage girl.

"And I'm free, free fallin' [/] Yeah I'm free, free fallin'". He is "free" in the sense of being uncommitted, not chained down to the conventional family structure of living with his child; but he's "fallin", as the years catch up and he realizes what he has missed out on (in not seeing being there on a daily basis to see her grow up). He made a tradeoff, choosing short-term quality of life (he preferred not to live in the family unit in the boring Valley) instead of long-term fulfillment (which he sees now, in seeing her maturation).

"All the vampires walkin' through the valley [/] Move west down Ventura boulevard". Not sure exactly what this means, but it is more emphasis on the Valley. Maybe the "vampires" have to do with the lifelessness/boredom of living in the Valley?

"And all the bad boys are standing in the shadows [/] All the good girls are home with broken hearts". He feels guilt at being a "bad boy" (as he said earlier). Right now, his "good girl" is not "home with [a] broken heart" -- instead, she loves her boyfriend. But he knows that things come full circle -- the same way he broke the heart of his girl's mother (and his girl when she was a child), so too the girl's boyfriend (or some other guy) may well break her heart in the future. He feels melancholy, knowing where he fits into society.

"I want to glide down over Mulholland [/] I want to write her name in the sky." By "writ[ing] her name in the sky," he wants to let her -- and everyone else -- know how much (despite not being a part of her daily life) he loves her. It's not that much of a romantic thing to do if you're trying to win over a girl who already has a boyfriend. Instead, the skywriting is a PUBLIC display -- to show her (and everyone else who knows he abandoned her) how much he really loves her. He also may want to express his fatherly pride at how nicely she has grown up.

"Gonna free fall out into nothin' [/] Gonna leave this world for a while." He is expressing his melancholy, at the consequences of his lack of involvement in his daughter's life. His free fall leads him "into nothin'", falling out of "this world" -- as he currently has no real connection with her. Also, perhaps his consciousness drifts to his own mortality ("leave this world"), as he realizes that she will be a large part of his legacy after his death. Or maybe, as another commentator seemed to suggest, "this world" refers to a geographic place of part of society, which he thinks of leaving. Either way, it is an expression of his melancholy at the situation.

Also, overall, the perspective and maturity in the lyrics are far more consistent with an older guy (her father) than with a younger guy.

Anyway, that's my take. I think it is supported by the video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lWJXDG2i0A) -- in which the narrator is obviously much older than the girl (who is a teenager), and he seems to watching over her (from above) in a fatherly manner. It's what I take from the song. It doesn't matter if Petty consciously intended (or didn't consciously intend) this interpretation -- I let the lyrics and music (and video) speak for themselves, which is my only concern here. Obviously, you can never be entirely certain of meaning -- if the meaning were obvious, there would be no need to try to interpret it. But, for what it's worth, that's my take. I share (my interpretation) only in the hopes that this interpretation will make the song more meaningful for at least one reader; if you don't agree or like it, then just disregard. You can also probably tell that I think this is an awesome song. (Otherwise, I wouldn't have spent the time writing this.)

Best wishes

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Eminem – Sing For The Moment Lyrics 9 years ago
obviously a brilliant song lyrically, but equally brilliant MUSICALLY.

this song combines 3 genres:

1. rap -- obviously

2. rock -- samples Aerosmith's "Dream On", for the chorus

3. classical -- the song starts w/ string music (from "Dream On")

lyrically, it has just as much depth -- classical seriousness to discussion (about politics, legal system, etc., other serious topics), but a huge rock/rap edge to it

brilliant lyrically & musically

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Eminem – The Real Slim Shady Lyrics 9 years ago
THIS SONG IS ABOUT:

how the Information age (internet, new media, etc.) is all about doing the most outrageous, absurd drivel just to get ATTENTION...

hence, the song begins: "May I have your ATTENTION please?
May I have your ATTENTION please?"

then it talks about attention-getting stunts, like Tom Green humping a dead moose, Aguilera/Spears/Durst/Daly sexcapades to get headlines...as well as Pam Anderson & Tommy

so Em playfully joins in the game, & says outrageous things -- like that he killed Dre...& talking about Viagra, etc.

he mocks how people are drawn in & attracked to the outrageous -- as w/ his parody of feminists saying that he grabs his you-know what, etc...

the point is that in this day in age, the attention goes to the vapid outrageous, so you play along -- by creating a persona (the Real Slim Shady)

amazingly, and ironically, this song comes right before Whatever You Say I Am on the CD... that song deals with an opposite reaction to the media/papparrazzi era that we live in... in that song he reacts violently against it -- but in this song (The REal Slim Shady) he has fun with it...

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The Doors – The Unknown Soldier Lyrics 10 years ago
"Breakfast where the news is read.
Television, children fed."

these lines have many possible meanings

"Television, children fed" could mean many things:

--perhaps we somehow feed the television (by giving our energy and attention to it (i.e., as in The Matrix))... so the line means that we feed the TV and we feed our children

--it could mean that the "television children" are fed --i.e., the children who are raised on TV are fed

--it could mean that the children who appear on TV are fed food --i.e., the children (Vietnamese perhaps) appear on TV, eating food

--it could mean that children are fed information in the form of TV -- just as adults are fed information in the form of newspapers ("Breakfast where the news is read"... interestingly breakfast is not where any food is eaten...instead breakfast is where information is consumed)

-- it could describe a lifeless routine that is so meaningless that it only merits a few words, thought of in a zombielike trance -- i.e., wake up, have breakfast and read newspaper... turn on TV, feed children (food)... etc. ... in this case, the "living dead" are ordinary people, zombies caught in monotonous domesticated lives

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The Doors – The End Lyrics 10 years ago
Kenwg:

thanks for the post. that's awesome that you saw the Doors perform live.

I dont disagree with anything in your post. From what I've read (Jerry Hopkins' No One Here Gets OUt Alive, and various articles, etc.), I agree with you about Morrison's thinking and the subconcious meaning and influences and spontaneity of the performances and creative process

the only general response that I would make (to explain my interpretation) is that the method of interpretation doesnt necessarily have be one or the other -- concious OR subconscious. i think the song can be interpreted on BOTH levels

i'm merely suggesting that there is a unifying theme -- westward movement -- that can provide a coherent, singular message to the song. but this doesnt deny the wild, searching, exploring meanings of the individual lines...

I wholeheartedly agree that Morrison composed the individual lines to the song without the message (of convincing a girl to move West) consciously in mind... but that doesnt mean that my interpretation is invalid

as for the blue bus, your interpretation is interesting. i wonder when the Santa Monica blue bus was named -- if it was in existence when the song was written, then perhaps the line has a double meaning... if not, then maybe the bus line was inspired by the blue bus (Numorphan) that you describe !

but I would say that Morrison's mind was full of tons of ideas and influences... so even when he engaged in on-stage "spontaneous visualizations" as you call them, still there were unifying themes in any one given song...

and undoubtedly some of what he improvised on certain nights did not make the final version of the song because it did not fit the overriding themes... as they continued to perform the song, the song probably expanded but only to include lines that fit with the central message

i think that you agree that the song has certain overriding themes, as you reference "the theme(s) of the song."

Also, interestingly, in your conclusion, you tie the song back to the West: "In much of the world, the arid American southwest for example..."

so perhaps we dont disagree much, if at all

if, as we both seem to agree, there is a Westward, existensial general theme to the song , then my interpretation (of convincing a girl to follow him West) is merely an attempt to provide one plausible context for the theme... undoubtedly, many of the archetypes in the song could be interpreted in many ways, though

either way, I dont think that Morrison would discourage the coexistence of multiple interpretations of any one given song. from what I understand, his beliefs in freedom and meaning were such that he might think that a given song could be interpreted in many ways-- and, perhaps within certain general bounds, a song such as this could mean whatever you thought it meant... he wanted to inspire thought and consciousness...

and yes, as you say " the mine' could actually be a reference Morrison's own mind"... in which case, the treasures that he excavated so long ago, have only become more valuable as we examine them -- and continue to find deep meaning in them -- today

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Beyoncé – Irreplaceable Lyrics 10 years ago
This song is an anthem to women's economic empowerment:

her guy has very little money:
"Everything you own in the box to the left"... obviously, he doesnt have much if everything he owns fits in one box

meanwhile, she is rich:
"In the closet, that’s my stuff ...
If I bought it, please don’t touch" ... she bought her own stuff

"And, it’s my name that’s on that Jag" ... she paid for a Jaguar...

meanwhile he cant even afford his own car, or even perhaps a cell phone to call a cab:
"let me call you a cab"

to her, a man is a commodity, to be replaced like a broken dinnerplate: "I could have another you in a minute"

this song is a pathetic attempt at stifling a woman's feelings of hurt and betrayal, and revelling in materialism...

the song also fails miserably in matching Beyonce's real life -- last time I checked, Jay-Z has enough money to afford a car ... and his yacht would not fit in a box...

so in real life, for all of the tens (or hundreds) of millions Beyonce has, she is still caught up in the old vision of needing to be with a man who has even more money than she does -- JayZ has at least $400 million, which is more than her

to call this song shallow and weak is an affront to other shallow, weak songs that at least have some redeeming value

the music is catchy, the rest is crappy

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The Doors – The End Lyrics 10 years ago
one more clarification regarding my last posting: the Blue Bus travels around Venice Beach (near LA, in California), which is where Morrison lived right before the Doors began succeeding.

it is actually called "big blue bus" -- http://www.bigbluebus.com

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The Doors – The End Lyrics 10 years ago
he is giving his girl an ultimatum that unless she moves west with him, then their relationship is over.

he tries to convince her to move west, through persuasion.

he reassures her that he loves her ("Beautiful friend") and that there is no one else ("My only friend").

he reminds her of the good times that they shared, and that there will be no more good times if she doesnt move West with him ("I'll never look into your eyes...again").

he talks of the virtues of the Western USA, which is more open and uncrowded ("So limitless and free")

he is moving West no matter what -- so he even tries to play on her sympathy, to make her feel bad about how isolated he will be alone out West, if she doesn't move with him ("Desperately in need...of some...stranger's hand In a...desperate land")...also, the message is that he will find another girl ("a stranger's hand") out West, if she doesnt follow

he reminds her of everything that is wrong with their current home (a "wilderness of pain"), where it is overcrowded with dense population ("And all the children are insane, All the children are insane"), a dry unbearable climate ("Waiting for the summer rain, yeah"), and the crime that goes along with overcrowded urban life ("There's danger on the edge of town").

He tells her directly to come west ("Ride the highway west, baby").

He promises her sexual fulfillment if she joins him ("Ride the snake, ride the snake"), as he is well-endowed ("The snake is long, seven miles").

He continues singing the virtues of the west ("The west is the best, The west is the best") and directly asks her to join him ("Get here, and we'll do the rest").

He talks about the public transportation in Los Angeles ("The blue bus is callin' us, The blue bus is callin' us" -- they have blue public buses in LA).

Then, if all of that hasnt worked, he takes her inside his mind and shows her the insanity of his current life -- shows her why he absolutely MUST move west, for reasons that do nothing to diminish his feelings for her (the Oedipal story "The killer awoke before dawn...He walked on down the hall, and And he came to a door...and he looked inside Father, yes son, I want to kill you Mother...I want to...fuck you"). Here he has made clear that he simply cannot continue living back home -- he needs to move west.

Then he repeats his past persuasion and makes perfectly clear that the only reason for the end of their relationship would be that she won't follow him to the West ("the end It hurts to set you free But you'll never follow me") ...that line says it all -- it is the end, but only because she won't follow him. In other words, she should follow him West, so that the painful end doesn’t have to happen.

If she doesnt follow him West, then that means there will be no more sex ecstasy together ("The end of nights we tried to die" -- "die" in its earlier meaning of sexual climax).

Then, finally, he ends his plea: "This is the end." From there it is up to her to follow him West, or else their relationship will be over.

He has delivered an ultimatum, but a loving, caring one that is full of feeling, explanation, and hope.


----------

On a biographical level, Morrison had lived in many places in his childhood, always being uprooted -- as his father was a naval officer, which required the family to move around the country something like 9 times during his childhood. For example, he lived in Florida before moving back to LA to get his degree at UCLA. This song fits with his appreciation of California and the American West, and the experience of moving and leaving your girl behind.

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The Doors – Touch Me Lyrics 10 years ago
another point:

people miss the point of this song, because they dont see the use of irony

as I said in my earlier (longer) post, The Doors are satirizing commercialized love songs, with the use of absurd promises in Touch Me:

"What was that promise that you made.

I'm gonna love you
Till the heavens stop the rain.
I'm gonna love you
Till the stars fall from the sky"

this is satire and melodrama -- as the instruments (horns and strings) show

you can understand Touch Me, by looking at similar use of melodramatic proclamations of love in Break On Through:

"I found an island in your arms
Country in your eyes
Arms that chain us
Eyes that lie"

the first two lines of that stanza ("I found an island in your arms / Country in your eyes") are typical overdone melodramatic proclamations of love

the second two lines reveal disdain for such overly-idealized views of love ("Arms that chain us /
Eyes that lie")

Break on Through was from their first album; Touch Me was from a later album when they were already established. the Doors had not gone soft -- they hardly needed to go commercial at the time of Touch ME ... they were already established

in Touch Me, they satirized sentimental overly-idealized views of love, which was simply a more subtle attack than their head-on assault in Break on Through

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The Doors – The Unknown Soldier Lyrics 10 years ago
"And it's all over.
The war is over
It's all over.
War is over. "

to me, these lines have at least 3 meanings

1) for the unknown soldier, the war is now over b/c he has been killed (hence, not only is "The [Vietnam] war" over, but also "War [generally, and all else] is over")

2) the irony that when the Vietnam war actually ends, and people celebrate (the next lines "...It's all over, baby! All over, baby! / Oh all right, yeah! / All over, yeah ha ha! / All over! ..."), then people joyously celebrating forget all of the unknown soldiers who were lost before the war ended

3) it is a wish fulfillment -- the audience desperately wants to hear that the war is over ... and so they engage in this fantasy where the Doors tell them that the war is over (even when they know it not to be true)

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The Doors – Touch Me Lyrics 10 years ago
CORRECTION to my last post:

music is your only friend is lyrics to When the Music's Over (not The End)

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The Doors – Touch Me Lyrics 10 years ago
you've misunderstood this song if you think it is commercialized, average, or banal...

it is a profound refutation/PARODY of commercialized love songs...

the commercialized love song insincerely focuses on some idealized, undefined love object -- e.g., "I wanna hold your hand" could be written to ANY GIRL and is thus insincere and commercialized pop

so what Touch Me does is to turn the song model on its head, and sincerely admit the truth -- namely, that the purported generic love object ("babe") is a mere sham...

whereas insincere love songs focus on the generic YOU (I wanna hold YOUR hand), by contrast the focus in this sincere song is on the self (ME) ... touch ME...

and so "Touch ME" ... yes, touch ME... admits that it doesnt really matter that much who the girl is... what is really desired has nothing to do with her anyway... it is a narcissistic/numb self-love that motives this honest ballad

Touch Me sincerely confesses the obvious truth -- namely, that the love object is the self (touch ME)... and the other person is just a means to gratify the self

that is profound

this song honestly admits to a selfish desire to be touched oneself (touch ME), with relatively little attention or focus on the other person

the honest confession of selfishness rings truer than the insincere pleas to an undefined, generic other person (YOU)...

the song also speaks to the derangement of the senses...

because NARCissism, as in NARCotic, is about NUMBNESS... and so the desire to be TOUCHED... touched how? physically, emotionally?

whereas "i wanna HOLD YOUR HAND" is clearly about physical touching, it seems that this song is about something more meaningful -- and thus far more elusive -- namely emotional or spiritual connection... "touch me" in the meaning of being touched by a movie, a novel, or A SONG (music is your only friend, the lyrics from The End)

perhaps, in a sense, this song is the anthem of the audience, in its plea to the Shaman (Morrison), asking Morrison to touch the audience emotionally/spiritually... just as Dylan's Tambourine Man expresses the audience's anthem to be entertained by the musician... in Dylan's song, there is a plea for the Tambourine man to sing a song -- so to here, the plea be be touched by the musician (Cmon Cmon Cmon now touch me)... (certainly Morrison made himself into a sexual object to be the "babe" to much of his audience)

certainly, it is about being touched in a more profound way than only physically ... that is why it invokes promises -- which carry a deeper meaning

"What was that promise that you made.

I'm gonna love you
Till the heavens stop the rain.
I'm gonna love you
Till the stars fall from the sky"

and yet the promise is revealed as nothing more than a meaningless cliche (Love you Till the heavens stop the rain or stars fall from the sky)...

lovers' promises are fleeting and plagiaristic, and in the end it is the music, the song that truly touches us, in our isolation-- allowing us to achieve feelings that we are often incapable of reaching in our private, intimate lives

this song parodies the cliched lover's promises, in exposing the truth of a selfish desire to be loved

this song admits to the same loneliness and numbness that is the staple of many the Doors' other songs (People are Strange, The End)...

the difference is that this is more subtle -- here, the confession of isolation is wrapped in a mask, an exterior that appears to be cliched and banal... but when that exterior is deconstructed, you see the same core that motivates many of the other songs

submissions
Johnny Cash – Folsom Prison Blues Lyrics 11 years ago
Boo Urns said:

"One thing though: if you shoot a man in Reno, you won't go to Folsom Prison because Folsom is California and Reno is in Nevada. That's the one thing that doesn't make sense to me...."

others echoed this.

but, actually, you can be sent to prison in one state for crimes committed in another state:

"Charles Harrelson was transferred to Supermax [in Denver], the highest-security federal prison, after attempting to break out of an Atlanta federal prison in 1995. Other inmates at Supermax, about 90 miles south of Denver, include Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski, Oklahoma City bombing coconspirator Terry Nichols and Olympic Park bomber Eric Rudolph."

this is from an article "Woody Harrelson's dad dies doing 2 life terms," LA TIMES 3/21/07 (http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/la-et-harrelson22mar22,0,4808635.story?coll=la-home-headlines) (Harrelson committed crimes in Texas for which he was in an Atlanta prison; after trying to escape, he then was sent to Denver prison)

also, as another example, Al Capone was in prison at Alcatraz (California) for crimes committed elsewhere (Chicago) (see, for example, http://www.1010wins.com/pages/38480.php?contentType=4&contentId=145944)

submissions
Crash Test Dummies – Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm Lyrics 11 years ago
i've read many of these posts.

my take on each verse:

1) verse 1 is about a kid who was really in a crash -- they say that he was in a crash. the "he said" part is only about his hair. it's not about abuse

2) second verse might be about an abused girl -- "she said they'd always been there" raises questions. the birthmarks could be bruises; but they also be real birthmarks

3) the 1st and 2nd kids are happy not to be the third, because of his zealously religious parents

the song is about shame and embarrassment. people draw the connection to abuse, which is interesting. abused people have shame and embarrasment, so this song is meaningful on that level, but it also speaks to much broader themes

the point of the song is that people point shame and embarrassment at others, to mask their own shame and insecurities. that's why the 1st and 2nd kids are happy not to be the 3rd kid; it's probably also why everyone else points shame at the 1st and 2nd kids -- everyone else points shame by asking for explanations for the hair and birthmarks (forcing the kids to explain "he said," "she said"). these other kids probably have stories and shames of their own, just less so than the 1st and 2nd kids. there is irony in that the 3rd kid's shame is not from his own body but his parents -- whereas the 1st and 2nd have shame about their bodies

it is an absolutely BRILLIANT song both lyrically and musically

sevendst19 is very much on target in the interpretatation

peace y'all

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