"The Sound Of Eight Hooves" as written by and Olavi Mikkonen Fredrick Andersson....
He's running through the woods so black
A loyal servant of christ
Dogs are barking down his back
He's running for his life

He came with words of love and peace
These heathens had to be saved
He thought that he could make them see
Instead he was enslaved

In captivity he spoke of god
To all he met he preached
But when his master's patience ran out
He knew he had to flee

Tears are running down his cheeks
As he sobbign realizes
That in this land his god is weak
And today he's going to die

He stumbles out onto an open field
Where an old oak tree grows
In the branches hang men of three
Dressed in preacher robes

His knees refuse to carry him on
Terror shines in his eyes
His faith in christ is almost gone
His god's left him to die
Below the dead he says his prayers
To the god he thought was alive
When he hears a calm voice say:
"Shut him up and hang him high!"

As his breath leaves his eyes open wide
A bright light comes from above
He greets this light with a smile
And thinks: "There is a God"

The sound of eight hooves reaches his ears
Comes from the heavenly light
Two wolves' howls fill his heart with fear
And he sees two ravens fly
Down from the sky a warlord rides
Like fire his one eye glows
And just before the preacher dies
He knows his god is false


Lyrics submitted by sean

"The Sound of Eight Hooves" as written by Johan Hegg Fredrick Andersson

Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC

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The Sound Of Eight Hooves song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • +1
    Memory"This is a song about how my forefathers used to hang preachers... because they would not shut up" -Johan Hegg
    vonsson August 14, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General CommentAnother anti-Christian song. It must have been really popular to be this edgy in 2001.
    KingQuestionon February 19, 2014   Link
  • -1
    General CommentAmon Amarth usually makes songs about Norse mythology, and the Norse seem to not religion. So, maybe this is a song about killing a preacher during a war.
    krucifier_on February 23, 2006   Link
  • -1
    General CommentHistorically, there was significant conflict between the Christian religion and the native Nordic religions. Of course early on the vikings did a lot of raiding of Christian nations, later however Christianity spread into the region. During this time there was a lot of conflict between the two religions, though obviously Christianity ended up converting or killing most followers of the old religion. This is a commonly recurring theme in Amon Amarth songs. In this case the song pretty clearly states that it is about an early Christian missionary, presumably to Scandanavia but which of the Nordic countries makes little difference. (I think the events are pretty clear from here on out)
    alderqueenon April 13, 2006   Link
  • -1
    General CommentBasically i get the idea that a Christian preacher is being chased by Vikings for trying to convert them and is about to be killed so he looks up and thinks God is coming to him, only to find that his God doesn't exist because it's Odin coming down from Valhalla to kill him. But I always thought Odin's horse had six legs not eight.
    Oriaxon August 24, 2006   Link
  • -1
    General CommentSleipnir has eight legs - it is said that it represents the 8 legs of a coffin (4 to stand on, 4 handles (legs) where the coffinbearers take it), or the 8 legs of the 4 coffinbearers themselves, representing that you can ride Sleipnir into the realm of death (which Hermodr did when trying to rescue his brother Baldr) or that Odin rides his own coffin into war, given that he is foredoomed to be killed by Fenris during Ragnarök.
    Shimmergloomon September 28, 2006   Link
  • -1
    General CommentHail Odin
    Cowboy from hellon June 21, 2007   Link

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