"The Dumbing Down of Love" as written by Guy Sigsworth, Imogen Jennifer Heap and Jon Hassell....
Well painted passion
You rightly suspect
Impersonation
The dumbing down of love

Jaded in anger
Love underwhelms you
No box of chocolates
Whichever way you fall

And if I tell you
Lover alone without love
What will happen
Lover alone without love
And will you listen?
Lover alone without, without love

No, no I'll get this
I want to treat you
You're still not famous
And you haven't struck it rich

Underachieving
'Cause no one's receiving
This tunnel vision
It's turning out all wrong

And if I tell you
Lover alone without love
What will happen
Lover alone without love
And will you listen?
Lover alone without, without love

Music is worthless unless it can
Make a complete stranger
Break down and cry

And if I tell you
Lover alone without love
What will happen
Lover alone without love
And will you listen?
Lover alone without, without love


Lyrics submitted by merchantpierce

"The Dumbing Down of Love" as written by Imogen Jennifer Heap Guy Sigsworth

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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The Dumbing Down of Love song meanings
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  • +4
    My InterpretationI believe this song is about an artist who is struggling with writing a love song. The artist is have all the people around her telling her to write a love song so she could make it big, but the type of love song they want is one that she can't write. When she says "And if I tell you, Lover alone without love. What will happen? Lover alone without love. Will you listen? Lover alone without love" She's speaking to the listener. Asking them that if she wrote a love song that will get air play, but be untrue to the actual meaning of love, would they listen to it? Will they make her famous? And the line "Music is worthless, unless it can make a complete stranger cry" May be the opinion of the opposing forces around her. They keep telling her to write a song that's going to speak to the LISTENER about love, instead of writing a song that speaks to her. She's completely overwhelmed by that. She wonders why would they want her to write a song for a complete stranger? The genius to this song is at the very beginning when she says "Well painted passion, you rightly suspect, Impersonation, the dumbing down of love, Jaded in Anger, Love underwhelms you, No box of chocolates, whichever way you fall...". She's talking about the popular love songs. How they're all copies of each other, and they all say the same things. She mentions two types of love songs in that part of the song. The songs that talk about how they suspect someone loves them and the other is when love didn't turn out the way they thought it would. It's always the same formula in pop culture.
    I think the whole song is mocking love songs in general. The title "The Dumbing Down Of Love" talks about how love songs make love sound so simple. How if she writes her music just to make it big and just uses the same usual material for her songs, it's dumbing down her music. It's dumbing down the idea of love. And she mocks songs in pop culture; by saying that they dumb down love.

    This song is absolutely beautiful. The music accompanied by Imogen's voice is what makes this song for me. If this song was done in any other way I probably wouldn't love it as much.

    And I'd like to add something. I've just recently discovered Frou Frou and Imogen Heap. Let me tell you, I've never listened to any other music that has spoken to me just as much as their music. I'm really hoping Frou Frou comes out with another album! But I'm still eagerly anticipating Imogen's third album! Her music is absolutely amazing.
    semi-colonon November 20, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General CommentMusic is worthless unless it can make a complete stranger break down and cry.

    keraaahon November 22, 2004   Link
  • +1
    General Comment"Well-painted passion" is whether intentionally or not a Shakespeare reference, Othello uses it describe Desdemona at one point (A4 S1 L253). Hell yeah books.
    myfriendbrennon September 14, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Commentperfection
    like a lot of imogen heap songs, i think it has several different themes running through it
    love
    music
    friendship, passion, and envy
    disappointment
    if you can't see it, look closer
    because it's all there
    Dweetleon May 27, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is one of the most beautiful pieces of music I have ever heard. It reminds me of unrequited love, a person loves but gets no love in return. "Lover alone with love." If you've ever been in that situation, you know how it tears at your heart. If you've seen the movie Magnolia, you know the line: "I have all this love and no where to put it." That is what this song identifies in me.
    Sugarbear0530on June 27, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentit's amazing, it's on repeat, it's beautiful.
    precipitateon November 21, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentis everyone positive she's not singing
    "love will roll on without love"
    cuz i've always heard it that way and am now disappointed that she may not have been singing that at all
    bencrumrineon November 28, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentComplete adoration to this song.
    *bows* Absolute and utter beauty. I'm going to cry now.
    noxiousbohemianon December 15, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOh, by the way, I always thought it was
    "Will you listen?" instead of "Will you miss him?"
    I'm not sure if that's just me though..
    noxiousbohemianon December 15, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentit's about an artist (likely, a musician) who has doesn't know love but is trying to write a love song. "Well painted passion. You rightly suspect" I think she is saying "will you listen" not "miss him"
    takenmusicon December 24, 2004   Link

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