"I Am Woman" as written by Ray Burton and Helen Reddy....
I am woman, hear me roar
In numbers too big to ignore
And I know too much to go back an' pretend
'Cause I've heard it all before
And I've been down there on the floor
No one's ever gonna keep me down again

Oh yes, I am wise
But it's wisdom born of pain
Yes, I've paid the price
But look how much I gained
If I have to, I can do anything
I am strong
(Strong)
I am invincible
(Invincible)
I am woman

You can bend but never break me
'Cause it only serves to make me
More determined to achieve my final goal
And I come back even stronger
Not a novice any longer
'Cause you've deepened the conviction in my soul

Oh yes, I am wise
But it's wisdom born of pain
Yes, I've paid the price
But look how much I gained
If I have to, I can do anything
I am strong
(Strong)
I am invincible
(Invincible)
I am woman

I am woman watch me grow
See me standing toe to toe
As I spread my lovin' arms across the land
But I'm still an embryo
With a long, long way to go
Until I make my brother understand

Oh yes, I am wise
But it's wisdom born of pain
Yes, I've paid the price
But look how much I gained
If I have to, I can face anything
I am strong
(Strong)
I am invincible
(Invincible)
I am woman

I am woman
I am invincible
I am strong
I am woman
I am invincible
I am strong
I am woman


Lyrics submitted by Katydid

"I Am Woman [Original Version]" as written by Ray Burton Helen Reddy

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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I Am Woman song meanings
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5 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment1970s girl power all the way , I love this song helen sings so nice . I think the spice girls moms must have jammed this on the hi-fi and 20 yrs. later the result was um well you know .
    bigwillie51667on October 27, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI can just imagine a generation of girls, burning their bras, listenng to this song.
    quiffpornon January 17, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI have loved this song since my days (and marching) with the feminist movement that is sadly no longer recognizable as the voice of choice (not just sexual) and equality (not preferential treatment). It truly was the anthem of the early 70's when I was blessed with my best friend's mother 'Nancy' who sat around drinking Fresca when she was not homemaking, and who shared her Ms. Magazine and political and personal war stories with me. Love the song! Love Helen Reddy. “I am woman. I am invincible” and I have family arriving today for the holiday which caused me to turn down two dates (with one person) set up by my good friend “T,” who’s always trying to find men for me. Merry Christmas to all you grinches and scrooges, but do notice the last two user names.
    Pleasemoveawayon December 23, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is Helen's song, not Barbra's or Jordan's or any woman who follows. Helen made it an anthem of the 70's at a time when one was needed. Over 50% of women living in poverty (often with children) were displaced homemakers. It wasn't until 1972 that a woman could get credit on her own. We may have gone to the extreme in the form of not appreciating the lives of innocent growing children and some may have sacrificed older children for extreme careers, but the movement WAS needed at the time. And today I celebrate this sense of freedom and accomplishment after having just installed my VERY FIRST new toilet seat! It sounds like nothin' (don't hate....appreciate), but when it's a first it's always special and important. (But now I do know that y'all men need to be assigned more work; you've been skatin'!!!) LOL. (...always a bad sign when one laughs at herself:) Helen's song ROCKS!
    Jeffreystumpon November 25, 2012   Link
  • -1
    General CommentI can't help but wonder if the women's movement of the 1970's, which is typified in Helen Reddy's "I Am Woman", resulted in a better world for women. Many women at that time thought that child-rearing, housework and taking care of their husbands was mundane and that men were 'keeping them down' at home. This movement led to a proliferation of dual income families that we still have now. In fact, I recently heard a statistic that there are now more women in the workforce than men. Are women happy about this? Do they like competing in the modern workplace - replete with mundane tasks at work, travel, projects, layoffs, small pay raises (if you're lucky), taxes, the daily commute, office politics, etc. As a recently minted stay-at-home Dad who has 'retired' from 20 years in the workforce, I can tell you that at least for me, being home is much better than being at work. Do the women of the 1970's, so desperate to escape their at-home lives, still prefer working over child-rearing, housework and taking care of their husbands?
    Freedom Loveron July 31, 2010   Link

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