"Nostalgic Pushead" as written by and Bradfield/edwards/jones/moore....
One two three four five six seven eight
I am the raping sunglass gaze
Of sweating man and escort agencies
60's Alienation the anthem of care
Now a knife constantly slashing eyelids
Slavery to the beat
Slavery to the chord
Slavery to the pleasure
Slavery to the God
Slavery to the beat
Slavery to the chord
Slavery to the pleasure
Slavery to the God
They dig the new scene and their parties
Where Stonehenge is worshiped and drugs a deity
Vicarious thrills re-run their youth
We follow we have no voice the dead
Radio nostalgia is radio death
I want to cover diamonds on my wife
Hardrock nostalgia the Stones on CD
Tranquilized icons for the sweet paralyzed
Slavery to the beat
Slavery to the chord
Slavery to the pleasure
Slavery to the God
Slavery to the beat
Slavery to the chord
Slavery to the pleasure
Slavery to the God
So cool the new sound of the decade
Thinks it's so fresh not a post Elvis still
All taste is nothing old pictures blowdried
Rebellion it always sells at a profit
I am a face of fashion in Soho Square
My tie is Paul Smith or Gaultier
My cheeks blood red as my favorite port
But hey cocaine keeps cholesterol at bay
Slavery to the beat
Slavery to the chord
Slavery to the pleasure
Slavery to the God
Slavery to the beat
Slavery to the chord
Slavery to the pleasure
Slavery to the God
Some god


Lyrics submitted by ShiverForMe

"Nostalgic Pushead" as written by

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Nostalgic Pushead song meanings
Add your thoughts

5 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +2
    General Comment"It originally started off with the idea of a middle-aged person knocking things that would be exciting and valuable to a new generation. So many people said to us when we started. 'Oh, seen that, done it, don't do it again.' It's really depressing that there's a new generation growing up and being offered the same icons, like The Rolling Stones. The biggest bands now, like Pearl Jam, obviously grew up listening to the same records their parents did. But the whole Sixties perspective of change no longer exists."
    (Richey James)
    manic4manicson October 23, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General CommentJust wondered how the references to God are relevant to the context of the song? Is it comparing on the similarities of nostalgia to religion? Or mocking the older generation embracing religion while still desiring the rebellious music of their youth? Could it even be a reference to Eric Clapton (a.k.a "Clapton is God")? Haha.
    iRawk1990on October 18, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General Comment" You are Radio Salvation. You are Radio Death. Slavery to the Beat - Slavery to the Pleasure. Slavery to your ego. Anyone can play guitar w/no emotion. Robot Robot Robot. "
    -Richey James in his 'Nostalgic Pushead' manifesto (the lines for the chorus were taken from there)
    .
    Also do u think that the part "slavery to the beat" has anything to do with the other meanings of beat, and the beat generation? For me it seems like that (as Nicky said on an interview they were reading too much Burroughs when writing GT!)
    nava115370on March 13, 2015   Link
  • -1
    General CommentIt's about the generation of the 1960's sexual revolution and so on growing older and still trying to hang on to the music, sex, ideals and rebellion of their youth even while those things have become nothing more than products marketed to them by corporations. It's the manics when they were young making fun of the older generation of music... of course now the manics are getting old themselves, I wonder if they still sing this song. Anyway it's a rockin' song and the manics totally rock regardless of age, but there's still a sense of schadenfraude.

    Feels good to yell "Rebellion, it always sells at a profit!"
    foolish_mortalon December 08, 2007   Link
  • -1
    General CommentLovely little 5 6 7 8 from Nicky at the beginning there...
    manic4manicson November 17, 2012   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain