"Ohio" as written by Patricia J. Griffin and Robert Plant....
The soldiers and Nixon coming,
We're finally on our own.
This summer I hear the drumming,
Four dead in Ohio

Gotta get downto it
Soldiers are cutting us down
Should have been done long ago.
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground
How can you run when you know?

Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are cutting us down
Should have been done long ago.
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground
How can you run when you know?

Tin soldiers and Nixon coming
We're finally on our won.
This summer I haear the drumming,
Four dead in Ohio.


Lyrics submitted by mtnweedgrls420

Ohio song meanings
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  • +1
    General CommentThe students at Kent State were protesting Nixon's bombing of Cambodia. Nixon made the order to bomb Cambodia during the Vietnam war because the Viet Cong would attack S.V. and then run and hide in Cambodia. Instead of ending the war as Nixon had promised, he was extending it into Cambodia. This is what upset the students at Kent. They were also upset because of the draft that was in effect. This was the age group that would be drafted into the war so they feard for their own lives.

    A concrete reason why the National Guard fired into the crowd on this particular day was never defined. However, they did kill 2 protestors and 2 innocent students walking from one class to the next. Another student was paralyzed and 8 more were injured.

    "Tin soldiers" refers to the National Guard.
    "We're finally on our own" refers to the freedom of college.
    "This summer we hear the drumming" refers to the marching of the National Guard.
    "What if you knew her, and found her dead on the ground" refers to the famous picture that hit newpapers and magazines everywhere after the event of a dead girl in the Kent State parking lot with another student kneeling over her.
    Love to Hateon December 08, 2005   Link

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