"Stop Breathing" as written by and Stephen Malkmus....
Got struck by the first volley
Of the war in the corps
Never held my service
Send em a wire, give em my best
This ammunition never rests
No one serves coffee, no one wakes up
Stop breathin'
Stop breathin'
Breathin' for me now
Write it on a postcard
Dad they broke me
Dad they broke me

[repeat]

I can see the lines open shutters
And the leaves flocked on a grid
That's what they made my hero say
But nothing gets me off so completely
But when you put it down
Ten feet down in the ground
Call and response in the negative home
Stop breathin'
Stop breathin'
Breathin' for me now
Write it on a postcard
Dad they broke me
Dad they broke me

[repeat]


Lyrics submitted by Racazip

"Stop Breathing" as written by Stephen Malkmus

Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC

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Stop Breathing song meanings
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16 Comments

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  • +3
    General Commenti LOVE the bridge of this song. right around 2min16sec into it. the how the bass comes in at 3min 16sec adding the coolest little layer before the song comes to an end.

    crooked rain, crooked rain = perfect 90s indie rock from start to finish
    prettywhnsedatedon December 05, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General Commenthmm, definitely does not sound like mayonaise.
    GlriusBlnknDshWrldon January 09, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General CommentAhh crap I meant chorus. The stop breathing bit.
    ZEROpumpkinson April 15, 2007   Link
  • +1
    General Commentalthough it does the silliness of war and tennis whites, 'stop breathing' is a great piece of off-kilter melancholy pop. i loved how pavement played with tunings so that the guitars sounded off-key but still melodic and right; and 'write it on a postcard - dad they broke me...dad they broke me' slays me every time i hear it.
    a m droneson January 28, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI always felt this song wasn't about war nor tennis or anything related to that....to me, it was a collegiate post-hangover song about the morning after in a fraternity house or dorms ("...no one serves coffee, no one wakes up"). The narrator is remembering the previous night in a weird way which gets him thinking about writing his dad and beg for money.
    GuyinGAon August 20, 2008   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI think it's about divorce [his own or his parent's] and/or death, or death as divorce, or even divorce/death/tennis as a metaphor for a terrible breakup. He never said his peace, having been beaten down right at the get-go. He is either telling himself to stop breathing, or telling his dad to stop breathing, thus ending the terrible onslaught. Looking through a window down at a tennis court, covered with leaves, remembering, perhaps thinking about the court lines as a division of property. It's so bad that he's even getting off on the burial scene. The deathwish of a broken man.
    Blixxyon June 24, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"Although it's about war, there's a deliberate double entendre about volleys and tennis. The title is supposed to be being shouted by some challenger who's losing in the U.S. Open. You know how they start getting upset at the slightest noise? Well, he's telling the crowd to 'stop breathing'. Literally." - SM
    benk0202on January 08, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSounds an awful lot like the Smashing Pumkins' "Mayonaise", but still a great song nonetheless. Pretty neat thing posted above me, too. Beautiful song.
    MickeyPhillyon November 19, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe first two verse chords are the same as Mayonaise, but doesn't sound too much like it.
    ZEROpumpkinson April 15, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Commentlove this song. i don't know what it is about it but the chorus just gets me every time, following me around in my head for hours.
    magkmonkeyon February 05, 2008   Link

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