"These Exiled Years" as written by and David R King Bridget A Regan....
It's four in the morning, battered and numb
A loaded room, an empty gun
I whistle a tune I heard years before
The clock started ticking, where did the time go?

I danced to the morning, she called out my name
The wind was a howling and down came the rain
Her arms, they caressed me, sweet was her brow
She opened my eyes to banish the doubt
Wash me down in all your joy
But don't drag me through this again

I've heard all your sad songs I can hear
It's in with the whiskey and out with the gin
I've heard all your sad songs I can hear
It's another day older in these exiled years

The dew on the ground blankets the face
Cold was the night and gone her embrace
For your land of the free now prisons me
To rot in this jail of lost liberty

Wash me down in all your joy
Don't drag me through this again

I've heard all your sad songs I can hear
It's in with the whiskey and out with the gin
I've heard all your sad songs I can hear
It's another day older in these exiled years

Walk away
Watch me as I wave
One foot here, but sure the other's in the grave
Walk away, walk away

I've heard all your sad songs I can hear
It's in with the whiskey and out with the gin
I've heard all your sad songs I can hear
It's another day older in these exiled years


Lyrics submitted by black_cow_of_death

"These Exiled Years" as written by David R King Bridget A Regan

Lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

These Exiled Years song meanings
Add your thoughts

7 Comments

sort form View by:
  • 0
    General Commentthis song is really powerful.
    AnIrishChiquitaon May 10, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song most likely describes a recurring theme in their music, the life as a poor immigrant. The character in the song is experiencing "these exiled years" because he is poor and of low status, being an immigrant still learning the ways of the country and trying to make something of himself in a not-so-welcoming world.
    Cumhal Macarton April 11, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIf you watched their documentary ("Whiskey on a Sunday"), Dave King, the lead singer/songwriter, talks about a period of time when he was essentially "exiled" (his words, not mine) in America. He didn't have a green card or anything, so he couldn't visit or go back home to Ireland, nor could he visit his mother for 8 years. When he finally could go back, his own mom didn't even recognize him.

    Anyways this song is about his homesickness and lonliness while he was basically exiled here in America.
    jimboa18on August 03, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti love this song so much!! it is such a powerful song and it has so much meaning. I absolutely love the trumpet at the end of the song. AMAZING!
    clw158ffon September 07, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentJust like jimboa18 said, that's what it's about.

    And to make it even more clear;

    "For your land of the free, Now prisons me, To rot in this jail, Of lost liberty" -> land of the free is America, but it wasn't no land of the free at all for Dave. It was lost liberty, it wasn't that beautiful as it was said to be. They pretty much prisonned him, cause he didn't get a greencard for a long long time.
    guinness_on February 17, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentagree with jimboa and guiness!
    very powerful and moving song, the first song i ever heard by flogging molly, and still my favourite
    huntingbears86on April 08, 2010   Link
  • 0
    My OpinionI know this song has nothing to do with Joseph Smith, but, as a Mormon, it always makes me think about him. In particular, the part where he says, "For your land of the free Now prisons me To rot in this jail Of lost liberty," reminds me of when Joseph Smith was wrongly imprisoned at Liberty Jail. I know. Just a total coincidence in the lyrics, but thats what I always think of.
    I LOVE FLOGGING MOLLY!
    seanstoon March 19, 2012   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain