"Cry Baby Cry" as written by John Winston Lennon and Paul James Mccartney....
Cry baby cry
Make your mother sigh
She's old enough to know better.

The King of Marigold was in the kitchen
Cooking breakfast for the Queen
The Queen was in the parlor
Playing piano for the children of the King.

Cry baby cry
Make your mother sigh
She's old enough to know better.
So cry baby cry.

The King was in the garden
Picking flowers for a friend who came to play
The Queen was in the playroom
Painting pictures for the children's holiday.

Cry baby cry
Make your mother sigh
She's old enough to know better.
So cry baby cry.

The Dutchess of Kircaldy always smiling
And arriving late for tea
The Duke was having problems
With a message at the local Bird and Bee.

Cry baby cry
Make your mother sigh
She's old enough to know better.
So cry baby cry.

At twelve o'clock a meeting round the table
For a seance in the dark
With voices out of nowhere
Put on specially by the children for a lark.

Cry baby cry
Make your mother sigh
She's old enough to know better.
So cry baby cry cry cry cry baby
Make your mother sigh.

She's old enough to know better
Cry baby cry
Cry cry cry
Make your mother sigh
She's old enough to know better.
So cry baby cry.


Lyrics submitted by Ice

"Cry Baby Cry" as written by Paul Mccartney John Lennon

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Cry Baby Cry song meanings
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35 Comments

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  • +4
    General CommentAlthough the comment about the children being ghosts seems plausible, I personally feel as though the comments about the disconnected family are correct. I agree with the fact that the way the king and queen are spoken of makes it appear that they are supressing their emotions about the king's obvious affair with the Duchess of Kircaldy, which is made even more apparent with the line implying the duke is sexually inadequate in some way (The duke was having problems/With a message the local "bird and bee".) The rest of the comments about emotional supression make the most sense to me. I think the baby, although it may actually be a child of the king and queen, represents all the characters in the song, who ultimately represent a lot of people in real life.

    The other comment about the ending of the song makes a lot of sense to me too, about how they wish to go back to times much simpler than the one they lived at the time, battling drug addictions and various prominent issues they must have been having in their lives.

    I wish we could go back and ask John what he intended this song to mean, though. I'm a teenager now, and like others said I was greatly impacted by the song for a reason I could not explain when I first heard it. It made my heart ache and I wasn't sure why, which was amazing.
    eleeexeyeon January 10, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General CommentThis song is actually wrtten around the nusery rhyme, 'Sing A Song of Sixpence', which I think his mother use to read to him (John). I think in this song he is earning for his mum...'can you take me back where I came back'. Personally I dont really know what this song means to me, except everytime I here it, I sort of just stop and have a think.
    MetChickon March 27, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General Commenti read that john liked alice in wonderland.i can't help but think that the baby is the pig-baby from the book. sounds nonsense,huh?
    greatpretenderon August 30, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI do like these theories a lot, but I do feel it's a little different. I feel as though the queen had an affair with another man, and the Dutchess of Kircaldy is the only one who knows, and the baby, most likely two or three, was in the room in his cradle when it happened. The queen is becoming more and more detached from her husband as she tries to draw his concern away from the baby, and the Dutchess keeps letting the word out. (Ex. The Duke was having problems with the message at the local "Bird and Bee". Perhaps she told the Duke and he was telling others while he was at the bar, but the message got mixed up? Mixed messages do happen a lot.) Near the end, at the seance, I believe the mischievous children said what they heard their baby brother say about the affair. (they were probably under the table, not dead.) The King, obviously ticked off, goes off and probably executed the man involved with the affair as his wife begs him not to do it, just to go back to simpler times.
    DoctorQ716on December 23, 2016   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis song is really interesting. it's about a lot of people, all related, and what goes on that they don't know about. and that at some point we all do stuff that makes our mother sigh.
    emma.leeon July 05, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song moved me very much when I first heard it as a young teenager.
    I think it's about about something Henry David Thoreau called "quiet desperation." It's sort of a theme that John was getting ramped up to further explore, some might say a bit obsessively, after the Beatles' breakup. In particular, there's a [Wilhelm] Reichian feel to it, tinged with a sense of whole-body, organic loss.
    The general mood is dark and tragic. Something is missing in these peoples' lives. They're trying to carry on normally, including being dutifully loving to family and engaging in neurotic, distracting pasttimes (the children acting out by holding a seance, looking for solace in another "world"), but they will all eventually regret not digging in and coming to terms with that sadness deep in their hearts.
    It's interesting to note that a person might reasonably not come to a conclusion like this one, just reading the lyrics and not hearing the recording. I believe this is a great case for the view that, with the greatest songs, interpretation of the lyric can't be abstracted from the total product. I think the production on this number very much contributes to this interpretation. The ponderous, thumping beat, to me, conveys the sense of life as a laborious, straightjacketed affair, which is a good way of describing people under emotional constriction.
    razajacon October 06, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentMaybe about human nature???
    beatles4everon October 30, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree with razjac on this one, since I heard it for the first time when I was fourteen. For some reason, it evoked the image of a vicious girl I met recently who had to have her way with everything...even other guys. I wished she got what she deserved, and this song's chorus seemed to be doling out her punishment.
    Ander Knighton December 02, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentwho plays piano in the background of this song, paul?
    GlitterGlueon January 19, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis is definitely one of the top 50 beatles songs
    mawkon January 27, 2005   Link

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