Big plans are being made for my sisters wedding day.
We'll have a ball at the Sons of Roma Hall.
Family, friends come one and all.
First the best man makes a toast to Rocky and my sister Rose,
"A life of years free of tears. Bottoms up and lots of luck!"
`
Polka, tango everyone, cha-cha, mambo Rose and Rock alone.
Frankie Rizzo and his Combo play on.

Single girls all hear the call from a crowd at the back wall
and when the bouquet flies each one tries to be the best catch and next years bride.
Uncle Sam and Uncle Joe take their places in the row.
They're standing by side to side for dollar dances with the bride.

Polka, tango everyone, cha-cha, mambo, Rose and Rock alone.
"He's a banker, she'll be well off now."

Sister Rose take your mother's place.
Trade your home and your maiden name.
For a list of vows and a veil of lace made a wife of you today.

Now they cut the five tier cake, "That Colucci, he can bake."
A frosted tower of sugar and flour for the couple of the hour.

Polka, tango everyone, cha-cha, mambo Rose and Rock alone.
She was born to wear that gown.

Sister Rose take your mother's place.
Trade your home and your maiden name.
For a list of vows and a veil of lace made a wife of you today,
but you're my sister Rose the same.


Lyrics submitted by kornchick

My Sister Rose song meanings
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  • +1
    My InterpretationI read this as a fairly scathing analysis of 'traditional' marriage/weddings and especially of the seemingly inevitably way in which Sister Rose (and all of the 'single girls' who 'hear the call' from the onlookers) falls into (and are encouraged by society into) it, almost without thought.

    It is a feminist song criticising the unquestioning changing of the bride's name, the pomp and pageantry of the dresses and dances, and the implicit subservience of the wife that all of this is there to legitimise. The line 'He's a banker, she'll be well off now' expresses clearly where the power is in this relationship.

    Arguably the line about 'Uncle Sam and Uncle Joe' (embodiments of the USA and USSR?) suggests that marriage/family/etc is an important part of maintaining a much broader social and political status quo.

    The final line suggests Mercahnt (or whoever she is giving voice to in the song) sees beyond all of the symbolic stuff on the wedding day and still sees and loves sister Rose for the person she is/was, not just as a wife, not just as 'Mrs Rocky'.
    lazaridis2on June 03, 2012   Link

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