"Amber Cascades" as written by and Dewey Bunnell....
Amber cascades all over today
Then we walk on a crooked catwalk
Only to be delayed
Bubbles of blue burst into two
Eaten up by the incoming tide
Of the new

Then we call to the man who walks on the water
We talk of a plan to stop all the slaughter in view
It's in view

Granite charades are played in the rain




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Till we fall through a sand castle window
To avoid the pain
Summer canoe paddles up to you
'cause it's time for another beer run
Or something that's equally true

Then we call to the man who walks on the water
We talk of a plan to stop all the slaughter in view

Then we call to the man who walks on the water
We talk of a plan to stop all the slaughter in view
It's in view


Lyrics submitted by Ice

"Amber Cascades" as written by Dewey Bunnell

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

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Amber Cascades song meanings
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  • 0
    General Commentwell the man who walks on the water isobviously jesus...

    but i dont really understand the verses
    fiascodagamaon June 02, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment‘"Amber Cascades." Perhaps one of America's most underrated songs, "Amber Cascades" had a peaceful, yet uptempo sound with harps, soft trombones, and breezy harmonies. Underneath the exterior, though, lay a more ominous current. As Dewey explained:
    It's harder for me to write a good song about something that's just a good, groovy time; there's always a "minor," as in minor chord, that I like to write about. It's sure hard for me to write about "bounced the baby on my knee" or "these fun times," you know. That isn't enough to get me to write. I always like to throw in something, get something extra; the words, the images, the colors, like purple or whatever, that have that little tinge of possible terror -- I call it menacing, that's the word. A little menacing. Minor keys, minor choruses, as in "Sandman": "I understand you've been running from the man." Or in "Midnight" and even in "Amber Cascades": "stop all the slaughter in view" -- just a word like slaughter.
    For all of its appeal, "Amber Cascades" was unable to rise past number 75 on the Billboard survey, and disappeared after just four weeks on the charts.’

    Source: Comprehensive History: America Revisited
    accessbackstage.com/america/…
    leonardo217on September 12, 2009   Link

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