"Grace, Too" as written by Robert Baker, Gordon Downie, Johnny Fay, Paul Langlois and Gordon Sinclair....
He said I'm fabulously rich
C'mon just let's go
She kinda bit her lip
Geez, I don't know
But I can guarantee
There'll be no knock on the door
I'm total pro that's what I'm here for
I come from downtown
Born ready for you
Armed with will and determination
And grace, too

The secret rules of engagement
Are hard to endorse
When the appearance of conflict
Meets the appearance of force
But I can guarantee
There'll be no knock on the door
I'm total pro
That's what I'm here for
I come from downtown
Born ready for you
Armed with skill and it's frustration
And grace, too


Lyrics submitted by black_cow_of_death

"Grace, Too" as written by Gordon Sinclair Gordon Downie

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

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Grace, Too song meanings
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12 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentI saw The Hip in concert once (well okay, it was on TV, but the concert was 2000 miles away) and he changed the first line to : "He said I'm Tragically Hip" and the crowd went nuts. Also, on the album "Live Between Us", it is the perfect song to open with.
    HipFan_007on July 02, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General Commenti could never make out what gord was screaming at the end but when i finally did i got a new meaning to the song. i now think its about a pimp trying to recruit a new girl, but she’s having her doubts. the song is a conversation between the two. Anyway this is my analysis

    //he said I'm fabulously rich
    //C'mon just let's go
    ->The pimps saying this, he’s like common baby I have money for you, plus I got this john ready to go

    //She kinda bit her lip
    //Geez, I don't know
    ->She’s not sure if she wants to or not

    //But I can guarantee
    //There'll be no knock on the door
    //I'm total pro that's what I'm here for
    ->He’s trying to reassure her that everything will be ok, he’ll be right behind the door

    //I come from downtown
    //Born ready for you
    //Armed with will and determination
    //and grace, too
    -> She’s still debating whether or not she’ll go through with it, but she feels that she’s better than this

    //The secret rules of engagement
    //Are hard to endorse
    //When the appearance of conflict
    //Meets the appearance of force
    -> This is Gords interpretation of the situation. He’s basically saying that it’s hard to endorse prostitution because conflicts are settled by force, the pimp gets what he wants

    //But I can guarantee
    //There'll be no knock on the door
    //I'm total pro
    //that's what I'm here for
    -> The pimps still trying to convince her

    //I come from downtown
    //Born ready for you
    //Armed with skill and it's frustration
    //And Grace, Too
    ->She’s still debating with herself, but this line hints that she might have did this before

    //Him here now no
    //Him here now no
    ->This is her final say. Gord screams this in such a desperate way at the very end of the song. She does not want to do this
    buildatreeon February 23, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentSounds almost way too personal in my mind. Whether or not I'm right, that's a great interpretation buildatree. I still think it's a love song to some degree and it may be that Gord loves the girl who is the subject of this song.
    OpinionHeadon March 06, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI once heard Gord INTRO this song as follows - to paraphrase...
    "When I was in the military - peacekeepin' in Somalia - they had all these crazy rules - so I just tried to get laid a lot."
    canadianJAYon June 07, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti think this is about a guy whos in love with a hooker and wants to take her away, but shes scared because shes only ever been a hooker
    buildatreeon October 05, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI was just thinking about Jay said above and what a buildatree mentioned. I think it connects that the guy in question is either a soldier or a cop and he's in love with the hooker. That's a major faux pas in the eyes of the overseers and this could will end up court-martialed and/or demoted and/or otherwise. The second verse says it bluntly, "I come from downtown born ready for you. Armed with skill and it's frustration and grace, too." He's torn between her and his call to serve and to protect. He came from downtown to take her away in one of two ways: to the Casbah or to jail. That's the inferred meaning I believe.
    OpinionHeadon December 16, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think Gord Downie's lyrics in this song are truly striking, yet few talk about the Hip's other Gord, who also deserves some respect for making this song's emotion stand out. Gord Sinclair is truly a master of his instrument. Forget the bass guitar not getting respect - Gord Sinclair as a bass player does not get enough respect. Just listen to the album "Day for Night" in its entirety and you'll see what I mean. The entire album is borne out of his slick and melodic basslines. Songs like "Grace Too", "Greasy Jungle", "Yawning or Snarling", "Fire in the Hole" and "Thugs" are all rooted in bassline melodies. Listen to the guitars in "Fire in the Hole" especially. With the exception of the bridge, they never follow a structured melody, or chord progression. Mr. Sinclair takes care of that. Thats what makes it such a dark and murky album, aside from Gord Downie's cryptic lyrics.
    IvoKenton October 21, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI've always seen this as one of the most direct songs the Hip has ever written; a simple story about a wealthy guy trying to convince a prostitute to come to a hotel with him. The "rules of engagement" bit may be suggesting the hint of danger in the outcome.
    mhareon March 27, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThere's no hooker context. That's Sundown by another Gordie. It's just Gordie being Gordie - random and poetic. The lyrics become personal when they're this cryptic.
    falangon September 18, 2011   Link
  • 0
    Song MeaningThe lyrics allude to a very specific incident. In 1981, there was a 'knock at the door' Police in British Colombia wanted to question Clifford Olsen because Kim Werbecky told police she had been brutally raped and assaulted after getting in a car with a man who promised her work washing windows in Whistler. She was considered an unreliable witness because of her lifestyle and history and the serial killer was eventually released. He used this M.O. before and AFTER this incident to lure young people to their horrible deaths.
    MartinH4on February 11, 2013   Link

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