"Three Pistols" as written by Robert Baker, Gordon Downie, Johnny Fay, Paul Langlois and Gordon Sinclair....
All right
Well Tom Thompson came paddling past
I'm pretty sure it was him
And he spoke so softly in accordance
With the growing of the dim
He said, "Bring on the brand new renaissance
'Cause I think I'm ready
Well I've been shaking all night long
But my hands are steady

Three pistols came and three people went, on their way
Three pistols strong and three people spent

Well he found his little lonely love
His bride of the northern woods
But, she took me to the Opera House
Like she said she would
Then she sighed and she fell from the balcony
Shakespeare's bent to touch
She never had any time for me
'Cause I didn't protest enough

Three pistols came and three people went, on their way
Two pistols strong and three people spent
All right, all right, all right, all right, all right, all right, all right, all right, woo

Little girls come on Remembrance Day
Placing flowers on his grave
She waits in the shadows 'til after dark
Just to sweep 'em all away

I say, bring on the brand new renaissance
'Cause I think I'm ready
I've been shaking all night long
But my hands are steady

Three pistols came and three people went, on their way
Three pistols strong and three people spent
Three pistols came and three people went on their way
One pistol strong and three people spent

Woo yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah oh, all right, woo


Lyrics submitted by black_cow_of_death, edited by stealthissound

"Three Pistols" as written by Gordon Sinclair Gordon Downie

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

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Three Pistols song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentThis song is about Tom Thomson, who was an influential Canadian artist in the early 1900's. He was an influential icon for the famous Group Of Seven and died under mysterious circumstances in Algonquin Park on a fishing trip. He was found dead in the lake - "Tom Thomson came paddling past" - but due to bodily harm, it is unknown whether or not he was murdered. This fact just adds to Thomson's mystique and thus The Tragically Hip decided to put his story to song.
    hollywoodloseron October 25, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is about Tom Thomson, who was an influential Canadian artist in the early 1900's. He was an influential icon for the famous Group Of Seven and died under mysterious circumstances in Algonquin Park on a fishing trip. He was found dead in the lake - "Tom Thomson came paddling past" - but due to bodily harm, it is unknown whether or not he was murdered. This fact just adds to Thomson's mystique and thus The Tragically Hip decided to put his story to song.
    hollywoodloseron October 25, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree about the Tom Thomson part, however i think that there`s also more to the song than that, like the bit about the Opera house. Does anyone know what that means?
    SingingStormWindon January 23, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe Opera House is a venue in Toronto
    icemachineon March 03, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWhen Tom Thomson died he was courting Winnifred Trainor who was allegedly pregnant with his child, she left for Philadelphia after Thomsons death with her mother, returning after Easter the following year. This might be the "Bride of the Northern Woods" as Trainor lived at her parents cottage on Canoe Lake.
    icemachineon March 03, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Comment so what's the 3 pistols part about?
    edge24on July 28, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI heard an interview about the meaning of all the songs on Road Apples and they said the song meaning has changed over time, but that it was mainly referring to a menage a trois (threesome). They also said it was inspired by a sign they passed on the road which read, "trois pistoles". This may have been a sign for the town in Quebec alluded to by kitakillerz.
    copywriterdaveon April 20, 2012   Link

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